Cooke seeks compensation from INSPORTS

first_imgThe Institute of Sports (INSPORTS) is being challenged by one of its creditors, Edward Cooke, whose lawyer has filed on his behalf for compensation from the government agency for monies owed for his services.Attorney Davion L. Vassell served the notice yesterday on the agency largely responsible for grassroots sporting development. It seeks payment for services allegedly rendered between July and October 2, 2014, which amounted to $619,000 and was accompanied by six invoices.The letter was addressed to INSPORTS to the attention of its chairman, Don Anderson, “re payment of funds to Edward Cooke”, with administrative director Ian Andrews and Cooke also cited.”I act for Edward Cooke in the captioned matter,” it said. “I am instructed that Mr Cooke did work on several occasions for the Institute and to date has not been compensated for services rendered.”I am further instructed that despite several demands, the Institute has failed and/or refused to honour its obligation to Mr Cooke.”Further, it said: “We demand that this sum be paid in two weeks of the date of this letter (January 5, 2015), failing which we will explore other avenues available to Mr Cooke without further notice to you if the debt is not paid.”UNAWARE OF DEVELOPMENTWhen contacted, Anderson said he was oblivious to the development.”I am not aware of it. I am sitting in my office working now and I will continue for the rest of the day to work, no intention to investigate this,” he noted.”If it comes to me, fine, but right now, I have no idea of it. If it comes to me, I will consult my lawyer, but I know nothing about it, so I cannot answer any question,” he further stated.Further calls were made to INSPORTS, where a source, who requested anonymity, explained that the situation stems from a policy change in September 2015 by the new board of directors, which relieved Andrews of the authority to sign cheques. The source said that has resulted in a backlog of payments to its creditors.Andrews was also barred from his office and sent on leave at the time.However, the latter actions were reversed after union intervention, with the exception of Andrews’ signing power.ALLEGED BREACHThis authorisation of cheques is now facilitated with signatures by two board members, an action the source alleges constitutes a breach of government financial regulations on the grounds that the board functions in an advisory capacity and is only responsible for setting policies, as opposed to an executive capacity, which would make it responsible for the day-to-day running of the agency’s operations.In the meantime, Cooke’s attorney expressed hope in the letter that the matter against the government agency would be resolved soon.”We look forward to a prompt and positive response in light of the above,” said Vassell.last_img read more

Anne Frank chestnut tree may be cut down

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre “I’m not doubting the tree is sick and may have to be cut,” he said. “What I’m saying is, I want a second opinion.” The tree suffers from a fungus that has caused more than half its trunk to rot. The city ordered it cut down next Wednesday, citing an appraisal that said it was in imminent danger of falling. But opponents, including the Netherlands’ Trees Institute, challenged the decision as hasty and argued that the tree is a historical monument worthy of extraordinary measures to save. The Utrecht-based institute carried out an independent inspection of the tree Wednesday and said it will seek an injunction to block the order. It said that while much of the tree’s trunk is diseased, what remains healthy is strong enough to hold during a storm and the main supporting roots are healthy. AMSTERDAM, Netherlands – Hiding from the Nazis in a cramped Amsterdam apartment, Anne Frank often gazed at a majestic chestnut tree visible through an attic skylight – her only window to the outside world – and dreamed of freedom. Now a group of conservationists and local activists are fighting to prevent the badly diseased tree from being cut down, saying it is a living link to the memory of the teenage diarist, who died in a Nazi concentration camp at 15. “It’s a monument to the spirit of what Anne Frank wrote – hope and light, which she did not have,” said Sylvio Mutal, a neighbor whose study overlooks the courtyard where the tree is located. Mutal, a former consultant to the United Nations on preservation of monuments, called a decision Tuesday by the city of Amsterdam to fell the tree next week a “betrayal,” after earlier promises to wait until Jan. 1 to consider a salvage plan. “This tree is of very great cultural and historical value, and ecological value,” said institute arborist Annemiek van Loon. “You can’t just replace a 160-year-old tree.” A rescue plan would likely involve supports for the trunk and limbs. The tree stands behind the “secret annex” atop the canal-side warehouse where the Frank family hid during Nazi Germany’s occupation of the Netherlands in World War II. The Jewish teenager kept her diary for 25 months until the family was arrested in August 1944. Her diary was preserved and later published and has now been read by millions of people. Anne Frank died in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in March 1945. “Nearly every morning I go to the attic to blow the stuffy air out of my lungs,” she wrote Feb. 23, 1944. “From my favorite spot on the floor I look up at the blue sky and the bare chestnut tree, on whose branches little raindrops shine, appearing like silver, and at the seagulls and other birds as they glide on the wind. …” “As long as this exists, I thought, and I may live to see it, this sunshine, the cloudless skies, while this lasts I cannot be unhappy.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more