Fort Pierce home goes up in flames

first_imgA Fort Pierce home caught fire early Saturday morning.St. Lucie County Fire rescue responded to a home on Gatewood Drive near Howland Boulevard around 3:30 a.m.Firefighters said the house was fully engulfed in flames when they arrived at the scene, adding, that no one was in home.Investigators and an arson dog are currently investigating the cause of the fire.No injuries were reported.last_img

American looks to extend streak vs BU

first_img Associated Press American looks to extend streak vs BU TEAM LEADERS: Boston University’s Max Mahoney has averaged 15.5 points and 7.8 rebounds while Walter Whyte has put up 12.6 points and 7.2 rebounds. For the Eagles, Sa’eed Nelson has averaged 18.2 points, 5.2 rebounds and 4.9 assists while Stacy Beckton Jr. has put up 9.9 points and five rebounds.FACILITATING THE OFFENSE: S. Nelson has either made or assisted on 49 percent of all American field goals over the last three games. S. Nelson has accounted for 29 field goals and 11 assists in those games.WINLESS WHEN: Boston University is 0-9 this year when it scores 67 points or fewer and 16-3 when it scores at least 68.PASSING FOR POINTS: The Eagles have recently converted baskets via assists more often than the Terriers. Boston University has an assist on 32 of 78 field goals (41 percent) across its previous three outings while American has assists on 36 of 81 field goals (44.4 percent) during its past three games.DID YOU KNOW: Boston University has committed a turnover on just 16.9 percent of its possessions this season, which is the second-best rate among all Patriot League teams. The Terriers have turned the ball over only 11.4 times per game this season. February 21, 2020center_img ___For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.com Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditAmerican (14-12, 10-5) vs. Boston University (16-12, 10-5)Case Gym, Boston; Sunday, 12 p.m. ESTBOTTOM LINE: American looks for its sixth straight win in the head-to-head series over Boston University. American has won by an average of 7 points in its last five wins over the Terriers. Boston University’s last win in the series came on Feb. 8, 2017, a 67-64 win.last_img read more

NYSPSHAA Task Force considers scenarios for 2020-21 school year

first_imgOf the six scenarios laid out by the task force, one involved a full return to school and the same fall, winter and sports seasons as before, though it included social distancing restrictions.Two other scenarios involved sports participation whether schools were open with a hybrid of in-person and virtual classes or had online instruction.In the first case (hybrid) fall sports would only include low-risk activities such as baseball, softball, tennis, track and field, golf, tennis, bowling and girls lacrosse, moving football, soccer and field hockey to the spring.If classes remained online as they were from March to June but sports were allowed to begin, the fall and spring seasons would get broken up into two parts, making for a total of five seasons of eight weeks apiece. Several sports would get shuffled.NYSPHSAA also presented another scenario where the hybrid and distance-learning models remained the same, but high school sports did not start in August.In both of these models, three seasons would cover 10 weeks apiece, starting on Jan. 4, with the sports usually played in the fall (including football) moved in between winter and spring sports and running through June 12.Yet another scenario addressed the possibility that different parts of the state might find themselves in different health-care situations due to COVID-19.If that were to happen, NYSPHSAA said that sections and regions had the right to amend their own schedules and not expect state championships to be contested.“The top priority shall be the safety of all associated with interscholastic athletics, followed by engaging students, with (state) championships being a low priority,” the task force said.NYSPHSAA also noted that a survey it conducted with more than 6,000 superintendents, principals, athletic directors and coaches said that fan attendance at events was less important than assuring that students were safe and healthy.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story What resulted, in a report released by the task force on the first day of July, were six proposals which covered a range of possibilities, though all of it depended on what Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Department of Education decide to do later this month.When schools were closed in mid-March due to the COVID-19 outbreak, it also halted high school sports, preventing state championships from taking place in basketball, ice hockey and bowling, and wiping out the entire spring sports season.The NYSPHSAA Task Force, whose members includes Jamesville-DeWitt High School principal Paul Gasparini, was formed to sort out how sports could return once the go-ahead from state officials was given. Of all the questions regarding what the2020-21 school year in New York State might look like, those surrounding the possibility of scholastic sports weigh heavily on the minds of students, parents and school administrators.And the only certainty is that it could go in many different directions, ranging from the status quo built up over decades to a radical overhaul of sports and seasons.A special task force formed by the New York State Public High School Athletic Association spent large portions of its first two meetings on June 10 and 30 discussing these options at length.center_img Tags: high school sportsNYSPHSAAlast_img read more

With retooled shot, Brendan Curry assumes larger role

first_imgBefore his college lacrosse trainees return home for the summer, shooting coach Torre Kasemeyer spends his Saturday nights watching game film. He calls players on Sunday with feedback and they discuss off-season goals. Through five games, Kasemeyer saw the same themes in Brendan Curry’s game. The sophomore saw himself as a facilitator, Kasemeyer said, and his speed often forced slides and opened passing lanes.With a quick first step, Curry could always shoot on the run. But what if he modified his release motion, changed the pacing of his stride and stepped into slides?“You can be a 20 goal scorer and stay where you are,” Kasemeyer said. “Or you can be close to a 30 and pick this up.”When Curry left campus for the summer, SU head coach John Desko told the rising sophomore to improve his shooting. He favored a sidearm on the run shot, and still does sometimes in moving situations. Last year, Curry had played hero for Syracuse against North Carolina when he scored two goals in the final minutes of regulation and assisted the overtime winner. But Kasemeyer saw the opportunity for Curry to build on his usual sweep down the right alley. And that training — combined with an injury to midfielder Tucker Dordevic — vaulted Curry’s production to a projected second-team All-American midway through the season while leading the midfield in points (27) ahead of the Orange’s game on Saturday against North Carolina.“My shooting’s been subpar,” Curry said after scoring on one of 12 shots against Duke. “I’m getting a lot of shots off and they’re not really falling, not all of them so I just got to keep working on that.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textCurry’s worked with Kasemeyer since his freshman of high school at Calvert Hall College (Baltimore) High School, where Kasemeyer is the team’s offensive coordinator. Kasmeyer noted Curry’s biggest improvement since he’s first met him was strength development, but this summer he coupled that with technical practices. Over the past summer, Curry worked with Kasemeyer through Gotskillz Lacrosse, where Kasemeyer trains lacrosse’s top shooters.This year, Curry’s moved his hands further away from his body to elongate the shooting motion, therefore generating more power. Kasemeyer compared it to a rubber band: the further back you pull the band, the more velocity upon release.Curry’s shooting motion is different, too. With time and space, Curry’s shooting more overhand. It provides more options in changing planes, Kasemeyer said, like starting with a stick high and shooting the ball low, or starting with the stick on the right and shooting to the left. Shooting overhand also limits the goalie’s ability to read the shot’s direction. When the shot comes from the side, the goalie can follow it all the way through the motion. When it’s overhand, the goalie can’t see the ball until it’s being released.“You usually try to go far pipe,” Curry said, “change your plan, drop your shoulder a little bit.”Anna Henderson | Digital Design EditorKasemeyer had Curry perform normal shooting on the run drills, but instead of traveling six or seven yards in a few strides after catching the ball, Curry stretched his steps. Stepping eight or nine yards in the same amount of paces meant a bigger step into his motion. Over the course of the off-season, Kasemeyer estimated Curry went from shots in the upper 80s to the low 90s in miles per hour.In Syracuse’s most recent game against Cornell, Curry caught a pass about 14 yards out from the goalie. With a moment before a defender came, he switched from his left hand to his right and stomped nearly three yards forward. His stick swung through and rocketed the ball into the left corner of the net.“He’s got a good first step,” Desko said. “He’s got good speed after the first step which gives him distance from the defender. And the bottom line then is, hit the back of the net. And I think he worked hard at that.”And there’s more to add to his game. Kasemeyer thinks with Curry’s speed, which forces defenses to slide, and the more powerful shot he could be scoring six or seven points a game. Curry wasn’t fond of his 1-of-12 shooting performance against Duke, despite scoring the game winner.Kasemeyer wants to work on inverting Curry, meaning he’d dodge from an attack spot though playing midfield. And he wants him to learn the step-down shot once more, this time left handed.“I think he’s a world team guy,” Kasemeyer said. “I’ve said since his junior year of high school, his game is tailored made for it and he doesn’t do anything but get better every year.” Comments Published on April 10, 2019 at 11:13 pm Contact Josh: jlschafe@syr.edu | @Schafer_44 Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more