FA expected to act after Aguero tangles with Wigan fans

first_img0Shares0000Manchester City’s Argentinian striker Sergio Aguero gets involved in a scuffle with Wigan fans © AFP / Oli SCARFFWIGAN, United Kingdom, Feb 20 – The Football Association are likely to launch an investigation into Wigan and Manchester City after Sergio Aguero was forced to defend himself at the end of a turbulent fifth round FA Cup tie at the DW Stadium.Will Grigg’s late winning goal saw League One Wigan defeat Pep Guardiola’s Premier League leaders in an ill-tempered game that boiled over on the final whistle. Wigan supporters invaded the pitch to celebrate at the end of the tie and Aguero, who was shaking the hand of opposing defender Chey Dunkley at the time, became embroiled in an ugly altercation with a number of fans.Aguero was forced to defend himself as the scene threatened to turn even more violent and City staff had to help shepherd him off the field and to the safety of the dressing room.“It’s not right,” said Wigan manager Paul Cook. “I haven’t seen the incident so I can’t comment. But players’ safety has to be paramount for everyone.”City are expected to contact Wigan themselves to demand answers about the lack of protection offered their players at the end, although the FA action may well take that out of their hands.The trouble was not over there as a number of home fans taunted the City support and, in response, the visitors began to tear at advertising hoardings in front of them.Police became involved in scuffles with City supporters that continued for several minutes and the FA are certain to review footage, and read referee Anthony Taylor’s report, before contacting the two clubs and deciding whether to issue charges.The problems were not restricted to off the field matters with City being reduced to 10 men late in the first half following a foul by Fabian Delph on Max Power which saw Taylor first produce a yellow card before changing it to red.That will rule Delph out of the Carabao Cup Final with Arsenal on Sunday and City’s anger at Taylor’s decision was evident in its wake, with Aguero arguing with the Wigan bench and Guardiola and opposite number Cook being separated by staff as they engaged in a furious argument in the tunnel at half-time.– ‘Aggressive opponent’ –“It’s a red card,” said Guardiola, who has been vocal this season after his own players have been the victim of bad fouls that did not produce red cards.“You want to ask me about football, ask me. Nothing happened in the tunnel.“He should stay in the position, that’s all. They were a really aggressive opponent.”The loss of Delph, who is playing at left-back in the absence of long-term injury victim Benjamin Mendy, could prove problematic in this crucial period of the season.But, contrary to his on-field actions, Guardiola claimed he had no problem with the decision.Fabian Delph’s dismissal sparked ugly scenes between Wigan and Manchester City © AFP / Oli SCARFF“It’s an unnecessary action,” he said. “The referee decides what he decides. I’m not here to judge so it can be a red card. We have to learn from that.”The stunning upset, a repeat of the 2013 FA Cup Final result, carried Wigan through to a home FA Cup quarter-final meeting with Southampton and ends City’s dream of winning all four competitions this season.“I didn’t have the feeling that we didn’t try,” said Guardiola. “That would be a worry.“We’re sad because the FA Cup is a nice competition but football counts what happens in 94 minutes. They deserved to go through.”The victory, however, was undoubtedly marred by the scenes at the end and the sight of Aguero having to defend himself as he left the field.Wigan chairman David Sharpe joined the criticism of the pitch invasion by his club’s supporters.“It is not nice to see, football is emotional — that’s what it is to fans,” he said. “But I don’t like to see this at the end of the game.“It is a massive result, but we have to stay classy in football, I don’t like what I am seeing here.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Rapelang Rabana: shaping the world

first_imgRapelang Rabana addresses the groupat the WEF Young Global Shakers gathering in Davos. The keyword is access, says Rabana.(Images: Global Shapers) MEDIA CONTACTS • Yeigo Communications  +27 21 424 2675 • Rapelang Rabana  Global Research and Development  The Telfree Group  @rapelangrabana RELATED ARTICLES • Social media growing strong in SA • Africa’s telecoms growth potential • SA at Davos: 20 years after Mandela • Internet promotes African freedom • Education goes mobile with VodacomEmily van RijswijckSouth African ICT entrepreneur and businesswoman Rapelang Rabana was a member of the first-ever delegation of young global shapers to the recently concluded World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland.The annual gathering took place from 25 to 29 January under the theme The Great Transformation: Shaping New Models.Global shapers are between the ages of 20 and 30 and are considered by WEF as having the potential to be leaders in all sectors of the global society.The 70-strong group included 20 young CEOs, a nanotechnology professor, a 24-year-old mayor from the Philippines and a bio-engineer who created a cardiac surgery simulator now used worldwide.The WEF website notes that with half of the world’s population under the age of 27, it is vital that young voices are heard at the annual meeting.WEF founder Klaus Schwab refers to his group of global shapers as “digital natives” who have grown up with the internet. The shapers were able to engage with world leaders during the annual meeting, and to give their perspectives on global problems such as unemployment among young people.Rabana, now 27, is no stranger to news headlines, having left her mark at a young age in the hugely competitive telecommunications field dominated largely by the huge conglomerates.In 2008 she was one of 200 young South Africans identified by the Mail & Guardian in their annual list of people with whom one should have lunch. The list, compiled by the weekly newspaper, showcases the country’s young trendsetters and trailblazers in their respective fields.Soft-spoken and eloquent, this University of Cape Town (UCT) business science graduate shared her vision on the WEF’s global shaper channel on YouTube. She said it is all about “access” – to opportunities, education, knowledge, ideas or other people – in order to secure a better future.She added: “I want to continue to find ways to deliver life-changing services. I see access to Davos as an opportunity to extend the reach and potential of my greatest aspirations.”Communication pioneerAnd helping people to have easier access to communications is exactly what Rabana set out to do when she started Yeigo Communications back in 2007 with two fellow UCT graduates.Yeigo was South Africa’s first mobile voice over internet protocol (Voip) company, and offered a software platform for voice calls made via mobile data networks. This was compatible with a wide range of mobile phones, and could be done at a fraction of the cost of conventional voice call networks.Yeigo’s business model worked on the same lines as Skype, another popular Voip application, and soon caught the attention of overseas investors.Just one year after starting to offer their services, Yeigo made a major global breakthrough with the multi-million sale of a stake in the company to US-based Quality One Wireless.Now heading up the Global Research and Development division at Swiss-based telecommunications company Telfree, with which Yeigo has partnered, Rabana’s dream is to continue doing what she does so well – making links and connecting ideas on a greater scale so that all South Africans can have some chance at changing their lives through mobile access.“Mobile broadband takes access to a new level,” she said. “These are engaging and exposing people to another world out there. The ways to make an impact are endless.”Ambassador for UN youth initiativeRabana was also chosen as ambassador for the 2011 World Summit Youth Awards (WSYA), a UN information communications technology initiative.  In this role she encourages young South Africans in the fields of electronic technology to take part in the initiative and in so doing, receive recognition for their efforts. Getting recognition through WSYA, while it holds no monetary value, is a sure way to attract likeminded people.The competition selects the best digital projects, products, applications and services by young people. Projects are chosen for efforts in reducing poverty and hunger, tackling ill-health, gender inequality, lack of education, lack of access to clean water and environmental collapse – all issues which tap into the UN’s millennium development goals.The award is promoted throughout the 160 UN member states to encourage young people to use their knowledge of the internet and mobile technology to create ways to put the development goals into action.last_img read more

Finding the Insulation Sweet Spot

first_imgCan Foam Insulation Be Too Thick? Payback Calculations for Energy-Efficiency ImprovementsPearls of Wisdom From Recent Conferences Energy Modeling Isn’t Very Accurate Sometimes, It’s Cheaper to Install PV Than More Insulation Building America Special Research Project: High R-Value Enclosures for High Performance Residential Buildings in All Climate Zones If you double the R-value of your insulation, the rate of heat loss is cut in half, Holladay continues. “The only questions are (a) whether more insulation is a good investment, and (b) whether the embodied energy of the insulation materials exceeds the energy that is likely to be saved over the lifespan of the insulation,” he says.Lewendal proposes the construction of three identical houses and studying the effects of adding more insulation. Although it’s possible this exact test has not been performed before, Holladay says, it really doesn’t matter.“Michael Blasnik (among other researchers) has assembled energy use data on hundreds of thousands of U.S. homes,” he says. “Energy researchers have developed sophisticated models that have been repeatedly validated by comparing modeled results to test home performance. In short, we know exactly what happens when we add R-20 of cellulose to an attic with R-38 cellulose. Of course, different families operate their houses differently. But we have all the data we need to do the calculations that you apparently think have never been made.” Passivhaus targets aren’t based on cost-effectivenessHolladay agrees with Lewendal that R-70 walls are overkill. Holladay notes, “You’re right; PHPP [Passive House Planning Package software] pays no attention to cost-effectiveness. All PHPP tells you is how to hit 15 kWh per square meter per year.”He also agrees that R-40 isn’t the right answer for all cold-climate builders. “If you have done the calculations for your housing type, your wall insulation type, your insulation costs, and your payback time frame, and you have come up with R-30, I have absolutely no reason to doubt you. I have consistently said, ‘You have to do the calculations.’” The work has already been doneLewendal could save himself the trouble of a new study, replies GBA senior editor Martin Holladay, because the work has already been done.“What you call a ‘theory’ is a truism enshrined in our building codes,” Holladay says. “The entire reason that the minimum insulation values in U.S. building codes are higher in Minnesota than in Florida is the well-understood calculation that you call a ‘theory.’” RELATED ARTICLES Parts of the equation we don’t knowCalculating the “sweet spot” of exactly the right amount of insulation with any precision requires two bits of information, adds Ron Keagle, the cost of energy and the cost of money over time. “It also depends on individual perception of thermal comfort and their willingness to pay for it,” he says, “although I suppose you could average that across all homeowners.”Another wild card, says James Howison, are the occupants themselves. Suppose they spend $200 a month on heating and cooling in a leaky, poorly insulated house. They stay on budget by adjusting the thermostat — a little cooler in winter, a little warmer in summer. With a better insulated house, they still spend $200 a month on energy but they can afford to be more comfortable, Howison says.“On one hand one could say that the improvements are yielding more comfort and are therefore efficient, but from an energy perspective it’s problematic,” he writes. “I suspect that this applies with existing housing, perhaps less with new housing. I think that the proposals to include energy costs in budgeting for getting mortgages would really help this, by including this expectation.”Holladay adds that there’s one more thing to ponder: “Here is a huge factor: should we include the external costs of burning fossil fuels in our fuel cost assumptions? Right now, the U.S. government is unwilling to enact carbon taxes that reflect the true economic cost of global climate change. As a result, every U.S. homeowner pays less for electricity, natural gas, and fuel oil than would be the case if the price of energy included the the true cost to the planet of burning fossil fuels.”center_img No, we still don’t know the answerDespite claims to the contrary, Lewendal isn’t convinced enough research has been conducted. He’s done the background reading suggested by Holladay and others, and is familiar with the suggestion that above-grade walls in cold climates be insulated to R-40.“What if the diminishing returns for insulation here in Bozeman is R-30 and we took your advice and installed R-40 in the next thousand homes and it turns out R-30 is where the curve bends down reducing the marginal improvement in performance?” he says. “The cost of going from R-30 to R-40 is about $3K. What is the opportunity cost for our customers if we overspent $3 million on insulation?”In fact, Lewendal says he has used two energy modeling programs and can’t conclude R-40 is best for his area. “We have studied models from all over the world and found that countries like Turkey and those in Scandinavia have done a better job of modeling the diminishing returns of insulation than we have,” he says. “Still, we are not convinced that prescriptive modeling matches performance very well. My best example is the PHIUS [Passive House Institute U.S.] model. They think that R-70 plus walls will give homeowners the best value. I am quite sure that a very low [air changes per hour] and modest insulation is more appropriate. The exact number for us here in Bozeman is what I want to determine.” R-40 may be ideal but consumers aren’t listeningThe bottom line, Lewendal adds, is that consumers don’t seem to be responding to the consensus that R-40 walls are close to ideal in a cold climate.“Most homes get about an R-21 because the government says it is good and our cities enforce that level of insulation,” he writes. “A few homes get about R-70 because they think Wolfgang [Feist of the Passive House Institute] is a smart guy and they will pay almost anything to reduce CO2 even if it means making more CO2 than the opportunity cost of that extra insulation… So, how do we get the average homeowner to ask for what your blogs have suggested, which is a PGH or pretty good house?”Lewendal thinks there are enough uncertainties to justify his new study.But to Keagle, his quest to find the insulation sweet spot can be based only in part on objective science.“The rest is intuitive and subjective,” Keagle writes. “Part of that is simply belief. You can build an example house and prove what it does. That would be convincing to the extent that it confirms part of the objectivity of the sweet spot.“But communication, information, explanation, and marketing can also be convincing without an example. Or the example can be part of the marketing as a working demonstration. I don’t see any of this as reinventing the wheel. The goal is to sell the public on the idea of higher efficiency.” Anders Lewendal, a builder in Bozeman, Montana, is wrestling with a familiar dilemma: What’s the right amount of insulation to put in a house?“Our theory,” he writes in Q&A post at GreenBuildingAdvisor, “is that too little insulation wastes energy and equally, too much insulation wastes energy. Where is the sweet spot in each climate zone?”To that end, Lewendal is proposing more performance testing.“We are interested in knowing if GBA has conducted any performance testing that makes diminishing returns conclusions,” writes Lewendal. “If not, we are hoping GBA might give us some advice that makes our experiment productive.”[Coincidentally, Lewendal is the founder of a “build American” campaign promoting the use of U.S. building materials. GBA has published two articles on his efforts: One Builder’s Buy-American Strategy and A 100-Year-Old Energy Star Home.] Our expert’s opinionGBA technical director Peter Yost added this:On one level, this sort of discussion drives me crazy. You simply can’t energy-model a single answer to the question of the “right” level of insulation or home energy efficiency. There are just too many variables, including changing wall configuration and systems with greater assembly depths; ever-increasing and unpredictable energy prices; climate change; assembly performance impact on the “right” mechanical system.And since many energy-modeling program results are either directly or inherently linked to simple payback analysis of the various energy measures, that really makes my head explode. We should not be using term-based payback analysis for long-term durable goods, like houses and their building assemblies. Please see the BuildingGreen blog I wrote on value transfer.And please also consider a recent GBA Energy Solutions blog by Alex Wilson in which he suggests that the insulation sweet spot can be a function of the PV sweet spot. I like the idea of comparing the opportunity costs for insulation and renewable energy, although to make the comparison really “apples to apples” the two approaches would need to have identical service lives (the PV system would need to last as long as the wall assemblies, or the insulation in them).In any event, I think the insulation sweet spot is a lot like the literal use of the term sweet, in relation to food: the best flavors are not just sweet, but a combination of flavors. The insulation “sweet spot” is actually a more complicated flavor involving more than just insulation.last_img read more

Connect with Personal Finance @MFLNPF

first_imgBy Molly Herndon Our  team’s presence on Twitter just got a bit easier to find. We’re now tweeting from @MFLNPF. Our team’s tweets, content and details about our upcoming webinars are shared from this handle, so be sure to follow us here to stay up-to-date on all the PF news.Last summer, our team and the Network Literacy Community of Practice hosted a Twitter cohort for personal finance managers. This two-week learning event was an opportunity for financial professionals to dip their toes into Twitter while working with a group to help newbies become acquainted with the social media space. Check out a recording of the first meeting below. Additional resources for learning about Twitter are available here.If you’re new to Twitter or an old pro, we’d love to connect with you and grow our network. Share you handle with us and follow us @MFLNPF!This post was published on the Military Families Learning Network blog on March 23, 2015.last_img read more

Coach Luke Walton: It ‘would be silly’ to tinker with Lonzo Ball’s shooting style

first_imgCPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA LATEST STORIES Kin of Misamis Oriental hero cop to get death benefits, award — PNP Read Next Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments 2 dead in California school attack; gunman shoots self PLAY LIST 03:122 dead in California school attack; gunman shoots self01:42Police: California school shooting took 16 seconds02:28Panelo on facing commute challenge: ‘It’s a silly acceptance’01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohortcenter_img So far in his first four games as a pro , Ball has certainly  had his share of ups and downs shooting the rock. The 19-year-old playmaker is currently averaging 29.4 percent from three-point range and 34.8 percent overall.But as far as Lakers head coach Luke Walton is concerned, he won’t require his new starting point guard to alter his shooting style anytime soon.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“For us to try to mess with it would be silly, because the ball goes in the net,” he told Laker analyst for Spectrum SportsNet, Mike Bresnahan.Lonzo’s unique shooting style won’t be changed.“For us to try to mess with it would be silly,” Luke said, b/c “the ball goes in the net.”— Mike Bresnahan (@Mike_Bresnahan) October 24, 2017ADVERTISEMENT Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball gestures to teammates during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Phoenix Suns, Friday, Oct. 20, 2017, in Phoenix.  (AP Photo/Matt York)Aside from his phenomenal court vision, the thing that stands out the most with Los Angeles Lakers rookie Lonzo Ball is his awkward-looking shooting form.Although he was a consistent three-point threat in his lone year at UCLA—knocking down a respectable  41.2 percent clip from beyond the arc—most pundits doubt if he can translate the success in the big leagues if he won’t tinker his shot.ADVERTISEMENT The Lakers currently hold a 2-2 win/loss record, with the second overall pick averaging 11.5 points, 9 boards and 9 assists per contest.  Khristian Ibarrola /raRELATED STORIES:John Wall on Lonzo Ball: ‘His dad does all the talking for him’NBA: Coach Luke Walton admits players ‘come after’ Lonzo Ball due to hypeADVERTISEMENT Moment of truth Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion MOST READ Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMClast_img read more

Patient Ceres tightens grip on Group F top slot

first_imgMOST READ View comments “But there’s a lot of things we have to improve. We have to be more patient when we build up. But the most important thing is that we got the goal and did not concede any goal.”Ceres is now three points clear of Singapore’s Home United, which suffered a 3-2 loss to Boeung Ket in Cambodia Tuesday night. Shan and Boeung Ket have three points each, but the Myanmar champions are ahead on goal difference.Only the top team in the group is guaranteed of a spot in the Asean zone semifinals.ADVERTISEMENT Typhoon ‘Tisoy’ threatens Games Guiao, NLEX brace for Paul Lee: ‘He’s the biggest problem’ Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university PLAY LIST 01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Pussycat Dolls set for reunion tour after 10-year hiatus Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH LOOK: Iya Villania meets ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ cast in Mexico Google honors food scientist, banana ketchup inventor and war hero Maria Orosacenter_img Read Next Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Families in US enclave in north Mexico hold sad Thanksgiving BACOLOD CITY—Stifled for long periods and missing numerous golden opportunities, Ceres Negros could have easily settled for a point.But the Busmen, buoyed by an energetic Panaad Stadium crowd, struck twice late in the second half to turn back a stubborn Shan United side from Myanmar, 2-0, Tuesday night to keep top spot in Group F of the AFC Cup.ADVERTISEMENT John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Substitute Patrick Reichelt and Bienvenido Maranon found the back of the net in the second half as the Busmen’s persistence finally paid off, enabling them to increase their tally to seven points from three matches.Reichelt’s 79th minute goal came off a defensive error, but the strike was a vital one as the Busmen finally broke through against a team that was set out to frustrate their attack.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutA moment of brilliance from Mike Ott set up Maranon for the second goal that finally sealed maximum points for the hosts. Ott beat three defenders on the left before cutting the ball back to Maranon who made no mistake.“It’s not easy to play teams that are dedicated at defending, but the effort was good and of course the players gave everything,” said Ceres coach Risto Vidakovic. LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

10 months agoTottenham ready to sell Dembele to Beijing Guoan

first_imgTottenham ready to sell Dembele to Beijing Guoanby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham are ready to sell Mousa Dembele to Beijing Guoan.The Daily Mail says Dembele is discussing his departure from Tottenham after Beijing Guoan offered £11million for the 31-year-old.Mauricio Pochettino is willing to sell the Belgium international as he has plenty of cover in midfield and talks are progressing. Dembele is fit again after his ankle ligament injury and has been training but isn’t in the squad to face Chelsea.Tottenham are willing to sell owing to the emergence of Oliver Skipp and the resurgence of Moussa Sissoko. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

Return of Donald Marshall Jrs eel nets recall days of historic fishing

first_imgHALIFAX — The recovery of eel nets that helped recast Aboriginal rights to earn a living from fishing is bringing back powerful memories for those touched by their story.Donald Marshall Jr. was charged with three counts of violating federal fisheries laws when he and his former partner Jane McMillan set the nets near Pomquet Harbour, N.S., in 1993.The seizure — and the storage of the gear in an Antigonish fisheries office — took Marshall all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada, where a ruling upheld treaties from 1760 and 1761 that said Mi’kmaq can earn a moderate living from hunting and fishing.However, Marshall died in 2009, at the age of 55, unaware the nets were still locked away.They were first noticed by Sana Kavanagh, a fisheries scientist at the Confederation of Mainland Mi’kmaq while she was doing a tour of a federal office earlier this year — which led to Fisheries and Oceans Canada sending the nets back to Marshall’s family.McMillan says when she attended the recent 20th anniversary of landmark legal decision, it was deeply moving to see and touch the nets that had once had been at the centre of a “happy and challenging” time of her life alongside Marshall.Jeff Ward, the director of the Heritage Park, says when he saw the photos of the nets on Sept. 14 and received notice they would be returned, he felt like he’d “discovered the Holy Grail.”Marshall, well-known for having been wrongfully convicted of murder in the early 1970s and himself the son of a Mi’kmaq grand chief, had become an eel fisherman in hopes of living a quiet life.He and McMillan had bought the nets in 1993 after a year of saving their money, she recalled.According to McMillan’s recently published book “Truth and Conviction: Donald Marshall Jr. and the Mi’kmaq Quest for Justice,” when a fisheries officer asked Marshall for his licence on a clear morning in August 1993, he replied, “I don’t need a licence. I have the 1752 treaty.”In addition, Marshall later informed fisheries officials that the chief of the Paq’tnkek Mi’kmaq had granted him permission to fish for eels in the waters near Antigonish.However, after Aug. 24, 1993, when Marshall sold about 463 pounds of eels for $1.70 per pound to a New Brunswick buyer, the fisheries officers swooped in and took all of his gear, and laid the charges.McMillan, now a professor of anthropology at St. Francis Xavier University, said it devastated their ability to earn a living, and set off the “public, expensive and lengthy” court battle that started on Oct. 17, 1994 in a provincial court.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 6, 2019.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

JewishMoroccan Heritage Caravan Unprecedented Step by Modern Morocco Azoulay

first_imgCasablanca – Unprecedented, responsible and symbolic by modern Morocco, the gesture by the Mimouna-Club Student Association made all Moroccans proud of the rich diversity of their heritage, said, on Wednesday in Casablanca, King Mohammed VI ‘s advisor André Azoulay.Speaking at the Casablanca stopover, Azoulay underlined the spontaneous, voluntary and pioneer aspect of the initiative undertaken by the organizers.Nobody suggested or asked them to form an association and go look for the Jewish chapter in our book history, the King’s advisor, noted. The New York Times was the first leading media outlet to comment and commend this step which it deemed would encourage the western world to be more cautious in making snap judgments towards the Arab-Muslim world, he recalled.last_img

Bruised bullied Badgered Buckeyes return home battered

Not only did Ohio State leave Madison, Wis., emotionally scarred, suffering its first loss of the season Saturday, but the Buckeyes also left physically scarred, with fewer healthy bodies than when they arrived. OSU’s already-limited defense has become further depleted because of injury. Leaving possibly the biggest void in the OSU defense is the loss of senior linebacker and leading tackler Ross Homan. Coach Jim Tressel said Homan will likely miss the next couple of weeks because of a foot injury suffered at Wisconsin. Already plagued with injuries this year, the defensive backfield has taken another hit with the loss of Tyler Moeller’s replacement, Christian Bryant, who will be out for at least this week’s contest against Purdue. “He had an infection last week, and we thought we had it under control, and he played a little bit in the game, and then he had a not-very-good reaction to it on the plane ride back,” Tressel said. “He’s been over at Ohio State Medical Center trying to get it under control, and I don’t know all the whys and the wherefores and whatnot, but it doesn’t look like he’ll be out of there until late this week.” As far as who will step in during Bryant’s absence, Tressel said he wasn’t sure yet but suggested a few possibilities. “Without having sat in the defensive room and talked about it with them, you have a couple different ways you can go,” he said. “Jermale Hines has played a lot of nickel, which would probably put (Aaron) Gant in the game. Nate Oliver was your No. 2 nickel all spring and all season until he got hurt, and he’s back healthy … or you can do what Iowa does. Iowa plays nickel with their base people.” Also on the defensive side, linebacker Dorian Bell remains out after suffering a concussion against Indiana. No matter who is in there, Tressel expects them to perform. “We’ve got to have someone ready. That’s why you get to practice Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and have walkthroughs on Friday,” he said. “If you want anyone to care that you’ve had three guys in your secondary hurt, you’re coaching the wrong sport at the wrong school because we’ve got to be ready.” Facing adversity Coming off its first loss in nearly a year, OSU is looking to pick up the pieces from its lackluster performance at Wisconsin last week, and Tressel said that loss will serve as a real test for his team. “We’ve always talked about leadership and maturity and that it’s not really tested until those adverse moments,” he said. “I think you’ll see a good demonstration of our level of maturity and leadership and so forth, and I have confidence we have the right kind of people.” With the loss behind them, the No. 10-ranked Buckeyes turn their sights to the conference-unbeaten Purdue Boilermakers. And although the Bucks once again find themselves attempting to bounce back from a difficult mid-season conference defeat, Tressel said that how his guys respond will say a lot about this team. “We told our guys countless times that there are 10 teams that want one thing for sure and that’s for Ohio State not to be the Big Ten champions, and that’s real,” Tressel said. “And now let’s see how you can handle it, and we’ll get a little glimpse of that at practice, but the real look at it will be Saturday and then the following Saturday and the following.” Continuing special teams woes After making strides in the right direction in recent weeks, OSU kick coverage took another step in the wrong direction at Wisconsin as the Badgers set the tone early, returning the opening kickoff 97 yards for a touchdown. “The bottom line is that when you’re covering kicks, there are no excuses,” Tressel said. “They don’t care if you get pushed in the back, grabbed, held, thought you should have gone around it, you thought the ball was going here or there. You have to fit. And just like when you’re playing defense, you have to fit. Kickoff, you have to fit from 70 yards away. Defense you have to fit from the line of scrimmage. We just didn’t fit.” Although the botched kickoff coverage is a point of concern for Tressel, he said it certainly did not cost his team the game. “Please don’t paint the picture that us having the kickoff taken back lost the game,” he said. “We still had 59 minutes and 48 seconds, so we had plenty of time to make up for that, but we’ve got to get better at that.” Defensive struggles The Badger ground game, at times, gave the Buckeyes fits. OSU allowed a 100-yard rushing performance for the first time in 29 games, as John Clay rushed for 104 yards. As questions continued to arise about OSU’s defensive performance, Tressel said the team’s depth at defensive line isn’t what it has been in recent years. “Are we as deep and can we rotate as much as when we had … (last year) you had Thaddeus (Gibson) and you had Lawrence Wilson, you had Doug Worthington, you had Todd Denlinger, you had Rob Rose?” Tressel said. “Those guys all were the rotators last year and they’re rotating elsewhere right now. But that’s where we are.” Despite lacking line depth, Tressel said the younger guys are continuing to come along, and his goal is for them to improve as the season progresses. Not the same Pryor OSU has become accustomed to Terrelle Pryor lighting up the score board, so the junior quarterback’s struggles Saturday seemed a bit uncharacteristic of his season thus far. And although there were passes Tressel said Pryor would probably like to have back, he was pleased with his signal caller’s effort. “I think he played extremely competitively,” Tressel said. “As far as competing and wanting to do anything he could do for the good of the team, he would have gone down to cover kickoffs if you let him, that’s just his nature. “I don’t know what else you can ask of a guy (except) to leave it on the field, and he left it on the field.” read more