Syracuse ties season high in hits in 10-6 win over Canisius

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on April 4, 2018 at 6:55 pm Contact Kaci: klwasile@syr.edu Left fielder Bryce Holmgren was at the plate. It was the bottom of the fourth and SU was up 4-3. Holmgren knocked the ball out to right field. It rolled past a diving Canisius first baseman and Holmgren was safe on first.Second baseman Gabby Teran advanced Holmgren to second with a ball far into center field for a single right after and Holmgren advanced to second. A wild pitch moved both players up a bag, placing both in scoring position. The next batter, center fielder Toni Martin, took advantage of that. She sent the ball deep into the outfield, doubling, and sending the baserunners home.After winning the early game of Wednesday’s doubleheader 6-2 and giving Syracuse head coach Mike Bosch his 600th career win, Syracuse (18-14, 4-7 Atlantic Coast) delivered its third-highest scoring game of the season in the second game against in-state foe Canisius (3-22), 10-4. SU had its highest combined batting average of the season and tied its season high in hits.“They have confidence in what they do,” Bosch said, “and I think what you see is that if one or two players have success the people behind them feel confident and it just kind of builds on each other.”Canisius was the first on the board, scoring three runs at the top of the third. It didn’t take long for SU to respond, scoring four in the bottom of the same inning.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIt started with center fielder Alicia Hansen, who had gone 1-8 in her last three games, launching one deep into the outfield. The ACC leader in triples added to her total and put herself in scoring position. A wild pitch during the next at-bat scored Hansen.“For me to be able to go up and overcome all the struggles I’ve been having in the last few at-bats, and then coming up and getting a triple, I think that gave everyone confidence,” Hansen said.Once the scoring started in the third inning, SU scored in each subsequent inning. Four came in the third, three in the fourth, one in the fifth and two to top it off in the sixth.SU posted a .467 batting average. That is its highest of the season by .032 and is about .200 more than the team’s overall average. It also tied its season high in hits with 14.“On average a game is like eight hits,” Hansen said. “14 hits is definitely a lot.”After Hansen scored in the third, it was a few at-bats before the last three runs were recorded. Martin and first baseman Faith Cain both walked, putting them at first and third when designated hitter Rachel Burkhardt stepped up to the plate. A line drive down the third base side pushed her to second base and allowed Cain and Martin to score. Catcher Michala Maciolek hit one out to right field to drive Burkhardt in for the final run of the inning.Ten batters stepped up to the plate for the Orange and all 10 got on base at least once. Nine of the 10 recorded hits. Pinch-hitter Andrea Bombace was the only person to not record a hit but was walked the one time she was up to bat. It was the first time since the George Mason game a month ago that the Orange notched 14 hits.“For us that’s huge,” Bosch said. “We’ve had times where we’ve had a couple people in the line-up who have had good games but putting up one through nine at times has been difficult, and so to see everybody in the line-up at least having a hit or getting on base or doing something productive is huge.” Commentslast_img read more

With retooled shot, Brendan Curry assumes larger role

first_imgBefore his college lacrosse trainees return home for the summer, shooting coach Torre Kasemeyer spends his Saturday nights watching game film. He calls players on Sunday with feedback and they discuss off-season goals. Through five games, Kasemeyer saw the same themes in Brendan Curry’s game. The sophomore saw himself as a facilitator, Kasemeyer said, and his speed often forced slides and opened passing lanes.With a quick first step, Curry could always shoot on the run. But what if he modified his release motion, changed the pacing of his stride and stepped into slides?“You can be a 20 goal scorer and stay where you are,” Kasemeyer said. “Or you can be close to a 30 and pick this up.”When Curry left campus for the summer, SU head coach John Desko told the rising sophomore to improve his shooting. He favored a sidearm on the run shot, and still does sometimes in moving situations. Last year, Curry had played hero for Syracuse against North Carolina when he scored two goals in the final minutes of regulation and assisted the overtime winner. But Kasemeyer saw the opportunity for Curry to build on his usual sweep down the right alley. And that training — combined with an injury to midfielder Tucker Dordevic — vaulted Curry’s production to a projected second-team All-American midway through the season while leading the midfield in points (27) ahead of the Orange’s game on Saturday against North Carolina.“My shooting’s been subpar,” Curry said after scoring on one of 12 shots against Duke. “I’m getting a lot of shots off and they’re not really falling, not all of them so I just got to keep working on that.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textCurry’s worked with Kasemeyer since his freshman of high school at Calvert Hall College (Baltimore) High School, where Kasemeyer is the team’s offensive coordinator. Kasmeyer noted Curry’s biggest improvement since he’s first met him was strength development, but this summer he coupled that with technical practices. Over the past summer, Curry worked with Kasemeyer through Gotskillz Lacrosse, where Kasemeyer trains lacrosse’s top shooters.This year, Curry’s moved his hands further away from his body to elongate the shooting motion, therefore generating more power. Kasemeyer compared it to a rubber band: the further back you pull the band, the more velocity upon release.Curry’s shooting motion is different, too. With time and space, Curry’s shooting more overhand. It provides more options in changing planes, Kasemeyer said, like starting with a stick high and shooting the ball low, or starting with the stick on the right and shooting to the left. Shooting overhand also limits the goalie’s ability to read the shot’s direction. When the shot comes from the side, the goalie can follow it all the way through the motion. When it’s overhand, the goalie can’t see the ball until it’s being released.“You usually try to go far pipe,” Curry said, “change your plan, drop your shoulder a little bit.”Anna Henderson | Digital Design EditorKasemeyer had Curry perform normal shooting on the run drills, but instead of traveling six or seven yards in a few strides after catching the ball, Curry stretched his steps. Stepping eight or nine yards in the same amount of paces meant a bigger step into his motion. Over the course of the off-season, Kasemeyer estimated Curry went from shots in the upper 80s to the low 90s in miles per hour.In Syracuse’s most recent game against Cornell, Curry caught a pass about 14 yards out from the goalie. With a moment before a defender came, he switched from his left hand to his right and stomped nearly three yards forward. His stick swung through and rocketed the ball into the left corner of the net.“He’s got a good first step,” Desko said. “He’s got good speed after the first step which gives him distance from the defender. And the bottom line then is, hit the back of the net. And I think he worked hard at that.”And there’s more to add to his game. Kasemeyer thinks with Curry’s speed, which forces defenses to slide, and the more powerful shot he could be scoring six or seven points a game. Curry wasn’t fond of his 1-of-12 shooting performance against Duke, despite scoring the game winner.Kasemeyer wants to work on inverting Curry, meaning he’d dodge from an attack spot though playing midfield. And he wants him to learn the step-down shot once more, this time left handed.“I think he’s a world team guy,” Kasemeyer said. “I’ve said since his junior year of high school, his game is tailored made for it and he doesn’t do anything but get better every year.” Comments Published on April 10, 2019 at 11:13 pm Contact Josh: jlschafe@syr.edu | @Schafer_44 Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Top Contenders for Fight of the Year

first_img Top Contenders for Fight of the Year Which is More Dangerous – MMA or Football? Latest From Our Partners Conor lashes out at Herb Dean, says Khabib was ‘riddled in panic’ during bus attack King Ryan Longsleeve Shirt Latest From MMA Warehouse More From Gordon Ryan Competition Kit Bloody Elbow Standard BJJ Gi [Pics] Why A Racing Legend Couldn’t Win A Race PostFun “I want to give him the benefit of the doubt and say it’s just because he’s a really good guy and he doesn’t believe that woman should be treated that way.” More: UFC on ESPN: Covington vs. Lawler fight card 2019 Coach Rankings Are In And It Doesn’t Look Good For… New Arena Accessories Recommended by [Pics] She Won A $188 Million Jackpot But Her Pastor Sued Her For It Finance 101 Greatest Highlights of Anderson Silva’s Career [Photos] New Renderings Show What Historical Figures… History 101center_img Sale Is This The Deadliest Animal On Earth? HorizonTimes Lockdown duffle bag White on Nunes-Cris rematch: ‘That’s the fight I want to make’ Apparel ProMax 440 BJJ GI Brock Lesnar’s WWE Future After UFC Retirement Several weeks ago, former Pride heavyweight champion Fedor Emelianenko was once again making MMA headlines, this time for his controversial views on women’s MMA. While the news was less than surprising given his background and traditional ideals, it still stirred many fans and pundits, many of whom were shocked by the comments.”Women shouldn’t compete in UFC/MMA because this sport is for men,” Emelianenko said. “There are a lot of sports where women look like women – like gymnastics, water sports, maybe some athletics.”However, there is at least one female MMA competitor who is not too concerned with Fedor’s comments. Felice Herrig, who was unaware of his comments before appearing on Submission Radio this week, stated that Fedor’s opinion was not surprising given his traditional upbringing.”I actually didn’t hear that, but I also think that it might be….you know like some morals and values are stricter in certain countries too. I don’t know. I don’t know how things are over there in Russia.”Apart from Fedor’s own personal upbringing and environment, Felice suggested that the squeamish perspective on women fighting was quite common in the United States as well.”Some people don’t like watching woman get hit. My uncle for instance. He’s not prejudiced against women’s MMA, he loves me, he supports me, but he will not watch me fight. He does not like to watch me get hit. Some people just, it doesn’t suit them well”Given that Herrig is well acquainted with this mentality, she is inclined to give Fedor a pass for his viewpoint. Gloves Medicare Part D: Open Enrollment is Here. Find Info & Costs Yahoo! Search Standard Ranked Rashguard Sponsored Content UFC 240: Fights to make Good Night Tee White: McGregor didn’t like my comments about Masvidal being ‘too big’ for him Timeline of Israel Adesanya’s Rapid Rise to UFC Contender Nightmare Matchup for UFC’s Biggest Stars Robert Whittaker hails ‘Wonderboy’ the best ‘outside fighter’ in MMAlast_img read more