Lennon are female champions again … Beat XLCR on penalties to retain title

first_img Lennon had the better play for most of the game with Gordon, Shanesia Smith, Judian Jones and Christine Graham putting the Xavier Gilbert-coached team on the defensive for most of the regular time, but lacked the quality to get the job done. Excelsior were not totally outplayed and did have their moments. They relied heavily on the presence of Tarania Clarke and her deliveries from set-pieces. For losing coach Gilbert, his team exceeded his expectations this season. “The girls were every disappointed they didn’t win, but I am proud of them, we did not expect to reach this far. We did not execute well (penalties) but their legs were tired and I don’t know if played a part,” he said. Lennon High School defeated Excelsior High 2-0 on penalty kicks in the ISSA Schoolgirl football final at Prison Oval yesterday, to win their seventh championship and their second in succession. After battling to a 0-0 regulation and extra-time scoreline, Renae Gordon and captain Petakaye Green converted from the spot for the Clarendon-based school, while Excelsior missed all their four kicks. Lennon had to go through extra-time and penalties in the semi-finals against Denham Town on Tuesday and although they had to do it all over again coach Sherlon Lennon, said they were well prepared. “We got most of the chances in regular time, but we didn’t finish off the game and we had to go to penalties but we were well prepared for it, and winning the title and bringing it back to the community is a wonderful feeling,” he said. BETTER PLAYlast_img read more

Bruised bullied Badgered Buckeyes return home battered

Not only did Ohio State leave Madison, Wis., emotionally scarred, suffering its first loss of the season Saturday, but the Buckeyes also left physically scarred, with fewer healthy bodies than when they arrived. OSU’s already-limited defense has become further depleted because of injury. Leaving possibly the biggest void in the OSU defense is the loss of senior linebacker and leading tackler Ross Homan. Coach Jim Tressel said Homan will likely miss the next couple of weeks because of a foot injury suffered at Wisconsin. Already plagued with injuries this year, the defensive backfield has taken another hit with the loss of Tyler Moeller’s replacement, Christian Bryant, who will be out for at least this week’s contest against Purdue. “He had an infection last week, and we thought we had it under control, and he played a little bit in the game, and then he had a not-very-good reaction to it on the plane ride back,” Tressel said. “He’s been over at Ohio State Medical Center trying to get it under control, and I don’t know all the whys and the wherefores and whatnot, but it doesn’t look like he’ll be out of there until late this week.” As far as who will step in during Bryant’s absence, Tressel said he wasn’t sure yet but suggested a few possibilities. “Without having sat in the defensive room and talked about it with them, you have a couple different ways you can go,” he said. “Jermale Hines has played a lot of nickel, which would probably put (Aaron) Gant in the game. Nate Oliver was your No. 2 nickel all spring and all season until he got hurt, and he’s back healthy … or you can do what Iowa does. Iowa plays nickel with their base people.” Also on the defensive side, linebacker Dorian Bell remains out after suffering a concussion against Indiana. No matter who is in there, Tressel expects them to perform. “We’ve got to have someone ready. That’s why you get to practice Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and have walkthroughs on Friday,” he said. “If you want anyone to care that you’ve had three guys in your secondary hurt, you’re coaching the wrong sport at the wrong school because we’ve got to be ready.” Facing adversity Coming off its first loss in nearly a year, OSU is looking to pick up the pieces from its lackluster performance at Wisconsin last week, and Tressel said that loss will serve as a real test for his team. “We’ve always talked about leadership and maturity and that it’s not really tested until those adverse moments,” he said. “I think you’ll see a good demonstration of our level of maturity and leadership and so forth, and I have confidence we have the right kind of people.” With the loss behind them, the No. 10-ranked Buckeyes turn their sights to the conference-unbeaten Purdue Boilermakers. And although the Bucks once again find themselves attempting to bounce back from a difficult mid-season conference defeat, Tressel said that how his guys respond will say a lot about this team. “We told our guys countless times that there are 10 teams that want one thing for sure and that’s for Ohio State not to be the Big Ten champions, and that’s real,” Tressel said. “And now let’s see how you can handle it, and we’ll get a little glimpse of that at practice, but the real look at it will be Saturday and then the following Saturday and the following.” Continuing special teams woes After making strides in the right direction in recent weeks, OSU kick coverage took another step in the wrong direction at Wisconsin as the Badgers set the tone early, returning the opening kickoff 97 yards for a touchdown. “The bottom line is that when you’re covering kicks, there are no excuses,” Tressel said. “They don’t care if you get pushed in the back, grabbed, held, thought you should have gone around it, you thought the ball was going here or there. You have to fit. And just like when you’re playing defense, you have to fit. Kickoff, you have to fit from 70 yards away. Defense you have to fit from the line of scrimmage. We just didn’t fit.” Although the botched kickoff coverage is a point of concern for Tressel, he said it certainly did not cost his team the game. “Please don’t paint the picture that us having the kickoff taken back lost the game,” he said. “We still had 59 minutes and 48 seconds, so we had plenty of time to make up for that, but we’ve got to get better at that.” Defensive struggles The Badger ground game, at times, gave the Buckeyes fits. OSU allowed a 100-yard rushing performance for the first time in 29 games, as John Clay rushed for 104 yards. As questions continued to arise about OSU’s defensive performance, Tressel said the team’s depth at defensive line isn’t what it has been in recent years. “Are we as deep and can we rotate as much as when we had … (last year) you had Thaddeus (Gibson) and you had Lawrence Wilson, you had Doug Worthington, you had Todd Denlinger, you had Rob Rose?” Tressel said. “Those guys all were the rotators last year and they’re rotating elsewhere right now. But that’s where we are.” Despite lacking line depth, Tressel said the younger guys are continuing to come along, and his goal is for them to improve as the season progresses. Not the same Pryor OSU has become accustomed to Terrelle Pryor lighting up the score board, so the junior quarterback’s struggles Saturday seemed a bit uncharacteristic of his season thus far. And although there were passes Tressel said Pryor would probably like to have back, he was pleased with his signal caller’s effort. “I think he played extremely competitively,” Tressel said. “As far as competing and wanting to do anything he could do for the good of the team, he would have gone down to cover kickoffs if you let him, that’s just his nature. “I don’t know what else you can ask of a guy (except) to leave it on the field, and he left it on the field.” read more

Clippers win backandforth game against Louisville

The Columbus Clippers defeated the Louisville Bats, 4-3, in the second game of the four-game series Wednesday night at Huntington Park. Left fielder Jerad Head went 3-for-5, and hit the Clippers’ winning RBI. Head’s bat came on at the right time, having gone 1-for-4 in his the last game against Louisville. “That’s the type of player he is,” Manager Mike Sarbaugh said. “That’s why he has done so well here.” Alex White pitched for Columbus, going seven innings and allowing five hits, two runs, two errors. He struck out seven batter and walked none. Louisville used Dontrelle Willis, the two-time All-Star remembered for leading the Florida Marlins to the 2003 World Series title. Willis was on minor-league assignment after signing with the Cincinnati Reds before the 2011 season. The evening started out with a pitching duel for three scoreless innings. “You gotta give him credit,” Sarbaugh said. “He threw well.” Louisville was the first to erase its bagel on the board when designated hitter Yonder Alonso collided with Clippers catcher Luke Carlin at the plate after first baseman Daniel Dorn doubled, giving Louisville a 1-0 lead. Louisville extended its lead to 2-0 when third baseman Todd Frazier singled, brining in catcher Devin Mesoraco, who snuck under the tag at home. Willis laughed and joked with his teammates. He came into the game having pitched 12 scoreless innings on the year, and extended his streak to 17 before giving. In the bottom of the sixth inning, Chad Huffman, on his first pitch, blasted his first home run of the year. “It’s funny,” Sarbaugh said. “Luke Carlin said before we hit that home run, ‘Come on, we gotta give him at least one earned run for the season.’” Willis was then taken out of the game, having pitched five innings with six hits, one run, one error, two walks and four strikeouts. Columbus tied the game in the bottom of the seventh when Carlin’s center-field crack hit the yellow line on the wall. The Clippers took the lead in the bottom of the eighth when Carlin’s RBI double brought in designated hitter Luis Valbuena, making it a 3-2 Columbus lead. After pitcher Josh Judy went in for Columbus in the ninth, Dorn walked and then subbed out for infielder Michael Griffin to pinch run. Third baseman Todd Frazier singled, moving Griffin to third. Griffin then came home when second baseman Chris Valaika popped out, allowing Griffin to tag up and scoot home, tying the game, 3-3. Head’s moment came in the bottom of the ninth. With third baseman Lonnie Chisenhall on third with the bases loaded, Head crushed a ball over second base, giving Columbus the win. read more

Thailand freezes ousted Yinglucks bank accounts

first_imgFormer Thai prime minister Yingluck Shinawatra greets her supporters as she leaves the Supreme Court in Bangkok on July 21, 2017. AFPThai authorities have frozen seven bank accounts belonging to ex-premier Yingluck Shinawatra over a $1 billion fine she faces for her administration’s controversial rice subsidy scheme, her lawyer said Tuesday.The move is seen as unprecedented because it financially sanctions an elected leader for a government policy and it is the latest in a barrage of legal battles she has had to fight since she was booted from office.Thailand’s first female prime minister, whose government was toppled in a 2014 coup, is already facing up to a decade in jail for allegedly failing to stop graft in the subsidy programme that targeted her party’s rural farming base.She was also retroactively impeached soon after the coup, a move that banned her from politics for five years.Yingluck’s legal team had petitioned for an injunction against the $1 billion fine—which dwarfs the roughly $18 million she has in publicly declared assets.But the Finance Ministry said Monday it was moving ahead with the order and planned to seize at least 12 accounts belonging to the embattled politician as an initial measure.Yingluck’s lawyer confirmed Tuesday that at least seven accounts had now been locked.“Bangkok Bank notified us that seven of her bank accounts have been frozen and cannot carry out any transactions,” Noppadon Laowthong told AFP.Yingluck, whose supporters have accused the junta of launching a political witch-hunt against her since seizing power, turned to Twitter to insist on her innocence.“I am ready to prove my innocence and that I have not done anything wrong in my closing statement on 1 August,” she wrote in reference to the final stage of her criminal negligence trial over the rice scheme.The verdict in that trial is due to be announced on August 25.Analysts say the junta and its establishment allies are bent on crushing the political machine led by Yingluck and her billionaire brother Thaksin Shinawatra, who was also ousted in a 2006 coup.The siblings are beloved in Thailand’s poor northeast but loathed by Bangkok’s traditional elite, who keep knocking down their governments with coups and court rulings.Under Yingluck’s flagship rice-pledging scheme the government bought paddy at nearly twice the market rate.It cemented her popularity among many farmers but led to huge stockpiles of unsold rice and cost Thailand its spot as the world’s leading rice exporter.Critics blasted the scheme as the latest graft-riddled populist handout by the Shinawatra camp, which has won every national election since 2001.The junta claims the policy cost Thailand around $8 billion in lost revenue.The subsidy scheme helped galvanise elite-backed protests in Bangkok that paved the way for the 2014 coup.last_img read more

Suu Kyi likens Rohingya issue to Kashmir

first_imgAung San Suu Kyi. Photo: AFPFacing the problem of Rohingya Muslims, Myanmar’s State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi on Thursday likened the issue to Kashmir and said that there is the trouble of sifting terrorists from innocent citizens.Suu Kyi told the media here that there was a need to differentiate between terrorists and innocent people and India was well versed with it, as it had been tackling the issue in Kashmir.“You in India will be very well versed in this. Because (there is) a large Muslim community in India and in places like Kashmir, you had this trouble of sorting out the terrorists from the innocent citizens and all those who are not involved in the terrorist movement at all. So we have the same problem,” she said.Suu Kyi said the Myanmar government had tried to provide security to all those residing in the country.“We have to take care of our citizens. We have to take care of everybody who is in our country whether or not they are our citizens. It is our duty and we try our best,” she said.Suu Kyi is under mounting international pressure to stop the alleged atrocities against the Rohingyas, who are even denied citizenship in Myanmar.Thousands of Rohingyas are crossing over to Bangladesh—where they are sparingly given refugee status—to escape from the violence in Rakhine state. Media reports quoted the UNHCR spokesperson in Bangladesh as saying that at least 123,000 Rohingyas have crossed over in the past few days.The latest exodus began on August 25, after Rohingya insurgents attacked police posts in Rakhine, leading to a violent offensive by the Myanmar army.India also faces the problem of Rohingyas fleeing into the states bordering Myanmar.Prime Minister Narendra Modi had said after his talks with Suu Kyi on Wednesday that India shared Myanmar’s concerns over the situation in Rakhine state and the loss of lives of security personnel and innocent people in the violence blamed on insurgents from the minority community.Modi hoped that whether in the peace process or resolving a “specific problem”, all stakeholders worked together to find a solution to ensure peace, justice and dignity for all by respecting the unity and territorial integrity of Myanmar.last_img read more

Greece wildfires death toll hits 50

first_imgA wildfire rages in the town of Rafina, near Athens, Greece on 23 July. Photo: ReutersFifty people have died and 170 have been injured in wildfires ravaging woodland and villages in the Athens region, as Greek authorities rush to evacuate residents and tourists stranded on beaches along the coast on Tuesday.The death toll soared with a Red Cross official reporting the discovery of 26 bodies in the courtyard of a villa at the seaside resort of Mati.The bodies were entwined and severely burnt, an AFP photographer at the scene said. They appeared to have been caught by the flames trying to reach the sea.The authorities had previously announced 24 deaths and scores of injuries with the majority of casualties found in their homes or cars in Mati, 40 kilometres (25 miles) northeast of the capital.Of the injured, 11 people were in serious condition.Port authorities told AFP they had found four bodies in the sea, including three women and a child who had apparently tried to escape the flames.There were fears the toll may rise further, as people remained unaccounted for.- ‘National tragedy’ -Interior Minister Panos Skourletis said rescue workers were “still searching if there are more missing”.”It’s a national tragedy,” civil protection agency official Ioanna Tsoupra told public broadcaster ERT.By dawn Tuesday, fires were still burning around the capital, while others broke out elsewhere during the night.Authorities were trying to evacuate inhabitants, government spokesman Dimitris Tzanakopoulos said.”Fifteen fires had started simultaneously on three different fronts in Athens”, he said, prompting Greece to request drones from the United States, “to observe and detect any suspicious activity”.Nine coastal patrol boats, two military vessels and “dozens of private boats” assisted by army helicopters were mobilised to help those stuck in the harbour in Rafina, one of the worst affected areas close to Mati.Evacuees were transferred to hotels and military camps, while worried relatives flocked to the area.Police in the town said they found two Danish tourists out of a group of 10 in a boat at sea off the town and were trying to locate the others.Civil protection chief Yannis Kapakis said he had told Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, who cut short a visit to Bosnia to return home, that winds up to 100 kilometres (60 miles) an hour were creating “an extreme situation”.Forecasters said conditions would remain challenging on Tuesday, although showers and falling temperatures were expected in Athens.In the north, more than 300 firefighters, five aircraft and two helicopters were mobilised to tackle the “extremely difficult” situation, Athens fire chief Achille Tzouvaras said.- Children evacuated -Video footage showed inhabitants fleeing the fires by car, with several buildings and homes damaged, as the region of Attica — which includes Athens — declared a state of emergency.”If I hadn’t left, I’d have been burned,” a 67-year-old resident named Maria told AFP.Near the town of Marathon, residents fled to safety along the beach, while 600 children were evacuated from holiday camps in the area.Tsipras said “all emergency forces have been mobilised” to battle fires along at least three fronts.”I am really concerned by the parallel outbreak of these fires,” he said, with officials raising the possibility they could have been started deliberately by criminals out to ransack abandoned homes.Fires are a common problem in Greece during the summer and can be major killers.Fires in 2007 on the southern island of Evia claimed 77 lives.- Sweden battles 27 fires -The Greek government has asked the European Union for help fighting the fires.In recent days, wildfires have also caused widespread damage in northern Europe.Sweden is experiencing an unprecedented drought and the highest temperatures in a century.On Monday, the Nordic nation’s civil protection agency MSB said there were 27 active fires across the country, as temperatures were expected to soar as high as 35 Celsius this week.Several European countries including France, Italy and Germany have sent planes, trucks and firefighters to help tackle the blazes in Sweden, where usual summer temperatures are closer to 23 Celsius.Some 25,000 hectares (62,000 acres) of land has already gone up in smoke or continues to burn — an area twice the size of the city of Paris.At least four of the fires had not been brought under control, MSB said, and weather conditions were unfavourable.- No rain since May -There has been practically no rain since the beginning of May in Sweden.The Forestry Bureau said Monday put the value of the destroyed forests at 900 million kronor (87 million euros, $102 million).Meanwhile in Finland’s northernmost Lapland province, fires have ravaged woods and grassland close to the border with Russia.Norway, which experienced its hottest May temperatures on record, has also seen several small fires, and one firefighter was killed on July 15 trying to contain a blaze.Fires have raged for five days in Latvia, destroying more than 800 hectares in the Baltic state’s western regions.last_img read more

Jones Hall Past Present and FuturePart 1

first_img Share To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /04:09 – / 5October 2nd, 1966: Number one on the radio Billboard charts was Cherish by The Association, Lyndon B. Johnson was president, and a war was raging in Vietnam.  Meanwhile in Houston, a new era for the arts was born.“When Jones Hall opened in 1966, it became home to the Houston Grand Opera, the Houston Ballet, the Houston Symphony, and the Society for the Performing Arts,” says Steven Fenberg, who is a walking encyclopedia on all things relating to Houston entrepreneur Jesse H. Jones. He’s author of the book, Unprecedented Power: Jesse Jones, Capitalism, and the Common Good and also wrote and produced the Emmy Award-winning documentary, Brother, Can You Spare a Billion? The Story of Jesse H. Jones.To know Jones Hall’s full story, we need to know a little about its namesake.“Jesse Jones grew up on a tobacco farm in rural Tennessee; it was his family’s tobacco farm,” Fenberg says, adding that it was a pretty lucrative business for the Jones family. But Jones wanted to see what else the world had to offer. At the turn of the century, the 24-year-old came to Houston to manage his uncle’s massive estate of sawmills and lumberyards and quickly became one of the foremost developers of the city. “He realized quickly that he would prosper only if his community thrived and the leaders back then also understood that,” Fenberg says.That brings us to 1910, when Jones served as building chairman for the construction of the City Auditorium. It was located on Louisiana Street between Texas and Capitol, where Jones Hall now stands. The multi-purpose facility was used for everything from symphony and ballet performances, to graduation ceremonies and even wrestling matches. Despite its stately presence on the outside, Fenberg says it was a “barn” of a building. “It was not air conditioned,” he explains. “Also, on occasion, the City Auditorium had rats. And if you wanted to sit front and center, you were sitting in a folding wooden chair.”Shortly before Jesse Jones died in 1956, he asked his nephew John T. Jones, Jr., to give Houston a better venue after he was gone.By June 1, 1962, John T. Jones Jr., and others from the Houston Endowment – which Jesse Jones established 25 years before — approached Houston City Council with a proposal. They’d build a brand new venue for the performing arts as a gift to the city with a price tag of $7.4 million. That’s about $55 million today. At that point, it was the largest grant Houston Endowment had ever made.“I believe the president of the Houston Symphony Society, General Maurice Hirsch, said it was the greatest moment in the history of Houston’s art,” Fenberg says, adding that the Endowment gave the Alley Theatre a half block of space for a new building just two weeks before. Houston’s Theater District was beginning to take shape.The hall opened its doors to the public on October 2nd, 1966.  On opening night, John Barbirolli led the Houston Symphony in a performance of a specially-commissioned piece by Alan Hovhaness, Ode to the Temple of Sound.   Fenberg compared the occasion to a phoenix rising from the ashes of the old City Auditorium.“All of the sudden, this gleaming, white marble, beautiful, modern building had taken its place,” he says. “There was nothing like it in the downtown area at that time and certainly nothing like it for the performing arts in Houston.”It was the just beginning of a new chapter for Houston’s performing arts scene. X Listenlast_img read more

Busy North Staffordshire roundabout to close for three nights from TODAY just

first_imgPunter found hiding in bushes Follow StokeonTrentLive Download our app – You can download our free app for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or get the Android version from Google Play.  Follow StokeonTrentLive on Facebook – Like our Facebook page to get the latest news in your feed and join in the lively discussions in the comments. Click here to give it a like! Follow us on Twitter – For breaking news and the latest stories, click here to follow SOTLive on Twitter. Follow us on Instagram – Featuring pictures past and present from across Stoke-on-Trent, North Staffordshire & South Cheshire – and if you tag us in your posts, we could repost your picture on our page! We also put the latest news in our Instagram Stories. Click here to follow StokeonTrentLive on Instagram. Get the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailMotorists fear the closure of a busy roundabout for three nights in a row will cause traffic choas. The A34 Talke roundabout is set to shut between 9pm and 6am from tonight (Monday) until Thursday so the carriageway can be resurfaced. It comes just three years after the same stretch was shut for three months for road repairs. Highways England today defended the latest work. Read MoreAbsolutely amazing’ May celebrates 100th birthday after century living in Tunstall   Project manager Don Haggart said: “This is essential work to resurface the busy Talke roundabout where the A500 meets the A34 north of Newcastle. Dad slams ‘disgusting’ hospital window The roundabout will be shut overnight for resurfacing work “Once the work is complete, the road surface will be much smoother for motorists. We’re doing this work overnight while the road is at its quietest and we’d like to thank motorists for their patience while the work takes place.” It will be closed in stages: Tonight, the A500 northbound exit slip road and south east part of the roundabout, including the access towards the A34, will be closed. The roundabout will still be accessible from the Newcastle direction; Tomorrow and Wednesday, there will be a closure of the A500 northbound slip only; On Thursday, there will be a closure of the A500 southbound exit slip and the north part of the roundabout, including access to the Travelodge and Subway, the A34 north of the roundabout and Peacock Hay Road. Back in 2016, Stoke-on-Trent North MP Ruth Smeeth raised the roundabout’s closure in Parliament,saying her constituents had not been consulted on the work. Haulier Barry Proctor, owner of Barry Proctor Services in Talke, says the latest roadworks will hit motorists who have no choice but to be out on the roads in the early morning. Want to keep up to date with the latest traffic and travel news?Each day Stoke-on-Trent Live journalists bring you the latest news on the roads and railways across Stoke-on-Trent, North Staffordshire, South Cheshire and further afield to help keep you on the move. For the very latest updates on roads including the M6, A500, A50 and more, visit our dedicated traffic and travel news channel here. We also run a live news feed each weekday, which you can access on our website’s homepage from 7am to 9pm from Monday to Friday. And for more as-we-get-it updates on the roads across the region and beyond, join The Sentinel’s traffic and travel Facebook group here. He added: “The closure will cause chaos and our lads are out before 6am, so I suppose we will have to pop down to Audley to use the A500. “It is a busy roundabout and there are potholes, but I don’t know why it is taking that length of time. “I would leave it as it is because it isn’t that bad, but there is a lot of traffic that comes that way.” Driving instructor Stuart Johnson, from Road Skills Driving School in Madeley, says striking a pothole can leave motorists with a hefty bill. Read MorePolice pull over this ‘swerving’ drink-driver (and find ‘large’ bottle of beer in cup holder)   “I do use that roundabout quite frequently, but I haven’t thought it is as bad as other roads in the area,” he said. “But this work is a step in the right direction. “Potholes are something people need to be aware of and, if you can’t avoid them, go over them slowly because the bills can be astronomical.” Read MoreTop stories on StokeonTrentLive Driver named following fatal collision Police search for missing womanlast_img read more

Belarusian pay TV and internet operator Cosmos TV

first_imgBelarusian pay TV and internet operator Cosmos TV has made the popular local portal Tut.by accessible to its subscribers.Tut.by will provide access to a wide range of services including TV services, to Cosmos TV subscribers. The Cosmos TV offering will not include Tut.by’s email service.last_img