Anglican Communion shocked by West Africa primate’s sudden death

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Obituary, Anglican Communion shocked by West Africa primate’s sudden death Tags Africa, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET January 24, 2014 at 1:36 am It is very sad to hear about the sudden death of my dear friend, father and mentor. Our times together in the Gambia were so memorable that we can not forget you so easily. We pray for the family and the entire Diocese of the Gambia. May God grant you the fortitude to bear this great loss. May your soul rest in the Lord. Amen Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Jan Butter with additional reporting by Bellah Zulu, ACNSPosted Jan 22, 2014 Anglican Communion, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Albany, NY Ven. Dr Chris Odoemena says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Bertram Emeka-Ekwue says: Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rev’d. Fr. Otuo-Acheampong, Ghana says: Rector Belleville, IL January 27, 2014 at 11:01 pm The church has lost a giant and a legend! RIP Archbishop Johnson. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Solomon Tilewa Johnson of West Africa died suddenly Jan. 21.[Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Communion is reeling at the sudden death of the the Primate of The Church of the Province of West Africa on Jan. 21.Archbishop Solomon Tilewa Johnson, 59, was also Metropolitan Archbishop of the internal province of West Africa, and bishop of Gambia. A popular figure both home and abroad, he died in Fajara while playing tennis – one of his favorite pastimes.Canon Anthony Eiwuley, provincial secretary, said he had received confirmation of the archbishop’s death from the family. He added that, in time, he planned to open a book of condolence to receive messages on behalf of the province and the family.Shock and sadnessMany people across the Anglican Communion have already expressed their shock at his death. In an e-mail to the Anglican Communion’s Francophone Network, bishop-in-charge of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe Pierre Whalon said, “What a loss for the Province of West Africa, for the Anglican Communion and for us all.”Bishop Zacharie Masimango Katanda of Kindu and Archbishop Henri Isingoma of the Democratic Republic of Congo also told network members how they had been saddened to hear of his death.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said: “The bishops and people of The Episcopal Church are grieving the death of the Primate of West Africa.  The province and his family are in our prayers.”Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby wrote to Johnson’s wife, Priscilla, and to the archbishop of the Internal Province of Ghana, the Most Rev. Daniel Sarfo, to offer his condolences and assurance of his prayers.He wrote to Sarfo: “I know that many will miss Archbishop Tilewa for his boundless energy and the great enthusiasm he had for his ministry, in the Church, both in Gambia, in the Province of West Africa, and in the wider Anglican Communion.“His gifts were not confined exclusively to the Church, and he had an active role within the national life of Gambia, serving as a member of a number of boards and committees. He was generous in his hospitality, and was always glad to welcome visitors to the Gambia, where he had served as Bishop since 1990.“I know that all my colleagues, the people of the Church of England, and especially those in the Diocese of Chichester with which the Diocese of the Gambia is linked, as well as your brothers and sisters across the Communion, will be holding you in prayer and love at this time.”The Rev. Canon Kenneth Kearon, secretary general of the Anglican Communion, said, “Archbishop Tilewa was a big man in every sense of the word. His great height made him stand head and shoulders over others, but so did his heart. He had a great love for the church, and worked hard for the spread of the Gospel in his own country, his diocese, and more recently, the Church of the Province of West Africa, which he served with distinction as Primate.“His immense pride in being able to represent his diocese at the Lambeth Conference of 2008 was matched by his love and compassion for those in any sort of need. He was a man of justice, and served with distinction on his country’s Independent Electoral Commission. All of this was rooted in his love for his Savior. To his wife and family, of whom he was so proud, to his church and to his country, we extend our prayers and our sincere sympathy.”Anglican Ollie Sagnia was one of those who expressed their grief on the late Archbishop’s Facebook wall, “Today we mourn but tomorrow we hope to celebrate your life and continue your work as you pass on the torch. You excelled at being a great family man and an outstanding leader, an embodiment of peace, love and humility. Your vibrancy, zeal and enthusiasm, blended with humor and wit, awed us all. You will always be our bishop.”John Kafwanka, Zambian priest and director for mission in the Anglican Communion Office, wrote, “What a shock to hear about the death of Archbishop S. Tilewa Johnson. You will be fondly remembered for your service to the Lord and humanity. We prayer for your family and the Church in Gambia and the whole Province of West Africa. Rest in God’s eternal peace.”Johnson served as a member of the Central Committee of the World Council of Churches.“He was a highly motivated and effective church leader,” said the Rev. Olav Fykse Tveit, general secretary of the World Council of Churches. “I came to know him in 2013 at the assemblies of both the All Africa Conference of Churches and the WCC.”“He possessed a strong commitment to the vision of fellowship and common witness and service. His ecumenical leadership internationally and nationally was inspirational,” Tveit added.The many other posts on Johnson’s Facebook page and elsewhere on social media sites expressed shock, sadness and a very personal sense of loss from people in countries including Ghana, Nigeria, the Gambia, England, Tunisia, and Sierra Leone. Several people even changed their Facebook photo to one of the archbishop to honor his memory.A man of firstsJohnson is the ninth primate and archbishop of the West African province. He became the first Gambian bishop, archbishop and primate.He was due to join members from across the Church of the Province of West Africa — from Cameroon, Cape Verde Islands, Ghana, Guinea Bissau, Guinea Conakry, Liberia, Senegal, Sierra Leone and The Gambia – at its Synod in February.A life of serviceSolomon Tilewa Ethelbert Willie Johnson was born in Banjul, The Gambia, on 27 February 1954. He attended the Wesley Primary School in Gambia from 1962 to 1966 and then Gambia High School until 1972.He started his career in 1975 as a teacher at Banjul’s Gambia High School. However, after two years he applied and was admitted to Trinity Union Theological College, Umuahia, Imo State, Nigeria. In 1980 he left with a Diploma in Theology.After three years at The UK’s University of Durham (1982-1985) he obtained a BA (Hons) in Theology. Twelve years later he returned to Britain to gain a Certificate in Theology from Oxford University. In 2000 he became a graduate of the Theological Foundation of Indiana in USA with a Doctorate degree in Applied Ministries.Solomon Tilewa Johnson was a deacon from 1979 to 1980, a priest from 1980 to 1990, and was a diocesan bishop from 1990. On 29 September 2012, he was elected as the 9th Primate of the Church of the Province of West Africa as well as Metropolitan Archbishop of the Internal province of West Africa. He was enthroned on 16 November 2012.He was designated ‘Person of the Year’ 2012, by the Gambia News and Report Weekly Magazine who said his selection was because of his “election as the 9th Archbishop and Primate of the 38 member Church of the Province of West Africa (CPWA), making him the first Gambian Bishop to hold such a position.”He was involved with a range of organisations and committees both in Gambia and overseas including mission agencies; educational establishments; national bodies tackling socio-economic issues; and such ecumenical bodies such as the All Africa Conference of Churches, and the World Council of Churches and the Gambia Christian Council.Archbishop Solomon Tilewa Johnson is survived by his wife, Priscilla Gladys Johnson and three children, Njilan Johnson, Jeggan Johnson and Dado Johnson. Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI January 23, 2014 at 3:20 am We have really lost a true servant of God. May his gentle and humble soul rest in perfect peace and rise in glory at the resurrection of the faithful. Amen The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC People Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments (3) Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA last_img read more

Episcopal Relief & Development partners with Texas dioceses on flood…

first_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Relief & Development partners with Texas dioceses on flood response Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Tags Episcopal Relief & Development [Episcopal Relief & Development press release] Episcopal Relief & Development is partnering with the Episcopal dioceses of Texas and West Texas in response to severe flooding caused by weeks of heavy rain across the region. Church teams in both dioceses are providing pastoral care and conducting needs assessments in areas where people lost homes and belongings to the floods, and church facilities are acting as ministry bases for outreach efforts. Episcopal Relief & Development support will assist affected households with gas, groceries and repair supplies, as well as storage for salvaged belongings and temporary housing for evacuees.“The dioceses of Texas and West Texas were able to convene teams quickly to identify community needs and see how churches can be of unique help,” said Abagail Nelson, Episcopal Relief & Development’s Senior Vice President for Programs. “Right now, response planning is focused on low-income households that are uninsured or underinsured, as well as people with disabilities who might need extra assistance as they recover from the storm. Church networks help ensure that vulnerable neighbors are included and cared for.”The extensive flooding began and worsened over May 24-26, with some areas receiving up to 20 inches of rain. In Texas, 27 people died as a result of the storm, and 10 people were still reported to be missing as of May 31. Thousands of homes were destroyed or damaged, and roads and bridges have been washed out.One of the most heavily impacted areas was along the Blanco river, which runs through the towns of Wimberley and San Marcos, about halfway between San Antonio and Austin in the Diocese of West Texas. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Wimberley and St. Mark’s in San Marcos have mobilized Flood Response Committees to conduct needs assessments and distribute gift cards for gas, food and emergency supplies.Wimberley is the town where eight people went missing after the river-front vacation home they were staying in was swept away. Five were members of the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd in Corpus Christi.In Houston, The Ven. Russ Oechsel, archdeacon for the Diocese of Texas, led the diocese’s Spiritual and Emotional Care team through the streets of the Meyerland neighborhood, where there was significant damage to homes. The group of trained lay and ordained volunteers distributed cold water and gift cards for repair supplies, and listened to residents’ storm experiences. They also offered information about how to connect to local and national disaster recovery resources and services.Oechsel is also Texas’ Diocesan Disaster Coordinator and a member of Episcopal Relief & Development’s Partners in Response team, which accompanies churches in disaster-impacted communities as they discern their role in the recovery process. Oechsel and fellow Partners in Response member Deacon Elaine Clements, from the Episcopal Diocese of Louisiana, are assisting the dioceses of Texas and West Texas at this time.“We are still very early in the disaster cycle, where folks are ripping out carpet and drywall or just trying to figure out what to do – depending if they own or rent their home, whether they had insurance or not, if they have somewhere close-by where they can stay while they sort things out,” Oechsel said. “Getting out into the neighborhood to provide pastoral care and gift cards for food and supplies also helps churches connect with people who may need help toward long-term recovery. We will start to know in the coming weeks where those longer-term needs are and how we can help.”Elsewhere in the region, the Episcopal Diocese of Oklahoma is responding to two waves of severe storms on May 6 and May 10 that brought tornadoes and flooding to the area. In Texas, St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Lindale (Diocese of Texas) is assisting in Van, 10 miles west, where a tornado and subsequent flood on May 10 destroyed a significant number of homes; Episcopal Relief & Development is working with the Episcopal Diocese of Dallas to develop a response plan. The organization has also been in contact with the Episcopal dioceses of Arkansas and Louisiana following the storms.For more information about Episcopal Relief & Development’s US Disaster Program, visit the organization’s website. To enable Episcopal Relief & Development to respond to disasters in the United States, please donate to the US Disaster Response Fund. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Posted Jun 4, 2015 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more

Daniel Hyde appointed music director at St. Thomas Fifth Avenue,…

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted Feb 8, 2016 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ People Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Daniel Hyde appointed music director at St. Thomas Fifth Avenue, New York Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags [St. Thomas Fifth Avenue] The rector, wardens, and vestry are delighted to announce the appointment of Professor Daniel Hyde as the 22nd Organist and Director of Music of Saint Thomas Church, Fifth Avenue, New York.A Message from the Rector“The Headmaster and I are thrilled with this appointment. The Search Committee has served the Church well and considered a large number of applications from around the world. The process was thorough and demanding, and I am delighted that there was a unanimous decision to offer the post to Daniel Hyde. Dan is a remarkable musician who already has an international reputation, a strong faith and a working knowledge and love of the liturgy of the Church, and we believe that he will be a worthy successor to John Scott. It is clear that Dan will fit well into our parish life, and we very much look forward to welcoming him this summer.”More InformationDaniel Hyde is Informator Choristarum, Organist, and Tutorial Fellow in Music at Magdalen College, Oxford. He is also a University Lecturer in the Faculty of Music. A former chorister and organ scholar of Durham Cathedral, Daniel was Assistant Organist at Perth Cathedral, Western Australia, before taking up the organ scholarship to King’s College, Cambridge. Upon graduation from King’s with First Class Honors in Music, Daniel was appointed as Director of Music at Jesus College, Cambridge. During his time there, he was responsible for overseeing the development of the College’s two choirs and for the design and installation of a new organ in the chapel.As an organist, he won second prize and the audience prize in the RCO Performer of the Year Competition 2002 and has since performed across four continents. Recent recital engagements have taken him to the USA, Germany, and Holland. He has also performed throughout Australia, including the Sydney Opera House and the Adelaide Town Hall. Closer to home, he has recently played in the St. David’s and Easter at King’s Festivals; St. Paul’s, Gloucester; Christ Church and Durham Cathedrals; Windsor Castle; Birmingham Town Hall; and the Wigmore Hall. He has been a concerto soloist with the BBC Philharmonic and the Britten Sinfonia, with whom he has performed the Poulenc Concerto a number of times, and has recorded the Hindemith Concerto to great critical acclaim. A disc of Christmas Organ Music from King’s was released in 2008. A regular accompanist to the BBC Singers on Radio Three, he has appeared at the BBC Proms on numerous occasions and made his solo debut there in the 2010 season performing Bach’s Canonic Variations on the organ of the Royal Albert Hall. As an ensemble player, he has appeared with the Britten Sinfonia, the Aurora Orchestra, the Gabrieli Consort, and the Academy of Ancient Music.Since moving to Magdalen College in 2009, he has often collaborated with the viol consort Phantasm, with whom he has given concerts and broadcasts at Wigmore Hall and in Vienna and Finland, as well as recording for Linn Records. Formerly Director of Cambridge University Chamber Choir and the locally based Harlow Chorus, Daniel was more recently Assistant Director and Accompanist to the London Bach Choir. Increasingly in demand as a conductor, he has worked with the Britten Sinfonia, the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, the Academy of St Martin in the Fields, the City of London Sinfonia, the Players of the Orchestra of the Sixteen, and the International Baroque Players. In Oxford, he has collaborated with the Philomusica and has also engaged Oxford Baroque to join Magdalen College Choir on numerous occasions.Magdalen College Choir enjoys an exclusive recording contract with Opus Arte, the label of the Royal Opera House.Notable PerformancesRecent and forthcoming engagements include concerts at the London Oratory, the St. Albans International Organ Festival, and summer festivals in Germany, Finland, and Edington. In 2014, he gave a recital as part of the RCO annual conferment of diplomas, the occasion at which the College marked its 150th anniversary. In the academic year 2014/15, he gave a series of recitals celebrating the inauguration of the new Dobson organ at Merton College surveying the complete organ works of J. S. Bach.Daniel Hyde’s Websitewww.danielhyde.co.uklast_img read more

Archbishop of Nigeria praises police after rescue of kidnapped church…

first_img [Anglican Communion News Service] The Archbishop of Nigeria has praised police and government officials after their successful rescue of three teenage schoolgirls who had been kidnapped from their church-run boarding school in Lagos.The three girls were taken from their dormitory at the Babington Macaulay Junior Seminary in the village of Agunfoye-Lugbusi in Ikorodu, Lagos. The school is jointly run by three Nigerian dioceses: Lagos, Lagos West and Lagos Mainland.The Lagos State Police have confirmed that the girls are safe and well and are being cared for in an un-named hospital in Lagos.“You know that the girls would have gone through a lot of trauma. However, the girls are hale and healthy,” police spokeswoman Dolapo Badmos told the Daily Trust newspaper. “We want to keep them away from public glare for now. We shall make our findings known to the press later.“We are all excited. The school authority is excited; the victim’s parents are all excited. We are happy that the girls were not harmed.”It is not known whether any ransom was paid to secure the release of the girls. The Daily Trust reports that the kidnappers had first asked for N100 million Nigerian Naira (approximately £354,000) for each girl; reducing this to N20 million and then N10 million.The Vanguard newspaper reports that the girls were rescued in Imota, on the outskirts of Ikorodu last Friday – six days after their abduction in “an act that outraged the nation.” The Vanguard says that news of the girls’ release “provoked spontaneous jubilation in their school.”“Three suspects were arrested, one was actively involved, two others are conspirators, who one way or the other aided the kidnapping,” the Lagos State Commissioner of Police, Mr Fatai Owoseni, told journalists. “With respect to the state of the girls, they are very well, they are very stable and immediate medical attention was given to them by police medical team.” He said that the girls had not been molested.He continued: “Someone had mentioned ransom. It is unfortunate that we keep on mentioning ransom. When you talk of ransom in cases like this, you are glorifying that. We shouldn’t be talking of that again in this country because if you are talking of ransom, you are telling others that kidnapping is viable and they can be going and kidnapping people to collect money.“I want to also say that what was employed in rescuing the girls is more of application of intelligence policing using the platform of technology, partnering with members of the community, pressures on the kidnappers and with that pressure they found out that there was no way for them again to keep these girls and that was what led to the success in saving the girls.”The Primate of Nigeria, Archbishop Nicholas Okoh, was fulsome in his praise for the security forces. Speaking to journalists after making a “thank you” visit to the police headquarters, he said that the officers had “performed exceptionally well.”He said that he was “very, very devastated” on hearing the news of the girls’ kidnapping. Concerns that the “young women [were] out in the cold, day and night” prevented him from sleeping. “When we got the news that they have been rescued we bounced back,” he said.Archbishop Okoh said that security at the school had been tightened with additional physical security measures and the employment of additional security guards; and the church was working “more closely with the police and other security agencies” to further improve security. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Archbishop of Nigeria praises police after rescue of kidnapped church school girls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Communion Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img By Gavin DrakePosted Mar 9, 2016 Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Africa, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA last_img read more

‘Un Pueblo Unido’ debate el reasentamiento de refugiados con antelación…

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL ‘Un Pueblo Unido’ debate el reasentamiento de refugiados con antelación a los eventos de la ONU Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Advocacy Peace & Justice, Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI El Ministerio Episcopal de Migración auspició “Un Pueblo Unido: Diálogo sobre el Reasentamiento de Refugiados y la Acogida Leal” antes de las dos cumbres de alto nivel programadas la próxima semana para abordar los grandes movimientos de refugiados y migrantes. Foto de Lynette Wilson.[Episcopal News Service] De los 21,3 millones de refugiados en el mundo de hoy, el 1 por ciento podría ser reasentado. Es una lotería con escasísimas probabilidades.En 2017, según cálculos del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados (UNHCR por su sigla en inglés), 1,19 millones de refugiados necesitarán ser reasentados. La próxima semana, durante una histórica cumbre de jefes de Estado y de gobierno, se les pedirá a los países que reciban a estos refugiados.“En 2015, poco más de 100.000 refugiados se beneficiaron del reasentamiento”, dijo Karen Koning AbuZayd, asesora especial de la ONU, el 14 de septiembre. “Eso suena bien, pero ahora queremos multiplicar eso por 10. La brecha es amplia. La ambición es grande”.Karen Koning AbuZayd habla durante “Un Pueblo Unido: Diálogo sobre el Reasentamiento de Refugiados y la Acogida Leal”, un evento que tuvo lugar el 14 de septiembre auspiciado por el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración. Foto de Lynette Wilson.AbuZayd, que presta servicios como asesora del secretario general de la ONU en la cumbre de la próxima semana, se dirigió a las más de 60 personas —funcionarios de la ONU, profesionales del reasentamiento de refugiados, ex refugiados y partidarios y defensores de los mismos— que se reunieron el 14 de septiembre en el Centro [Denominacional] de la Iglesia Episcopal en Nueva York para participar en el panel “Un Pueblo Unido: Diálogo sobre el Reasentamiento de Refugiados y una Acogida Leal”, auspiciado por el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración. El evento fue transmitido en directo vía Internet y posteriormente podrá verse en la Internet aquí.Un Pueblo Unido precedió a dos actividades de las Naciones Unidas programadas para la próxima semana. El lunes 19 de septiembre, la Asamblea General de la ONU celebrará la primera reunión de jefes de Estado y de gobierno que aborde los grandes movimientos de refugiados y migrantes, al objeto de unificar a los países detrás de un enfoque más humano y coordinado.Luego, el martes 20 de septiembre, el presidente Barack Obama será el anfitrión de los líderes en la Cumbre sobre los Refugiados, junto con los co-anfitriones de Canadá, Etiopía, Alemania, Jordania, México y Suecia. La cumbre de los líderes apelará a los gobiernos a que se comprometan a aumentar sus tasas de reasentamiento de refugiados.“El reasentamiento no termina cuando el refugiado llega a un nuevo país. En muchos casos éste es precisamente el punto de partida”, dijo AbuZayd.Es la fe de las comunidades, agregó ella, especialmente en Estados Unidos, lo que lleva a cabo la tarea del reasentamiento.Maher Shakir, al centro, un ex refugiado iraquí, comparte su experiencia durante el panel del 14 de septiembre sobre el reasentamiento de refugiados, en el que Jay Subedi, a la izquierda, ex refugiado de Bután, y Akram Hussein, de procedencia iraquí, también compartieron sus experiencias. Foto de Lynette Wilson.Durante las intervenciones de los siete miembros del panel —profesionales del reasentamiento, defensores y partidarios de los refugiados y ex refugiados— compartieron sus experiencias personales y profesionales. Una cosa que los ex refugiados querían que la gente entendiera es que nadie abandona su país sin una buena razón.“Nadie quiere dejar su hogar. La única razón por la que la gente deja su casa es porque esté en llamas”, dijo Abdul Saboor, un ex refugiado de Afganistán que ahora viven en Syracuse, Nueva York, donde es estudiante universitario y trabaja para el Centro de Nuevos Estadounidenses de InterFaith Works.El Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, el ministerio de la Iglesia para el reasentamiento de refugiados, trabaja con 30 agencias de reasentamiento afiliadas en 26 diócesis, ofreciendo ayuda directa a los recién llegados. También ofrece medios a las congregaciones de participar en el reasentamiento de refugiados en sus comunidades, alienta a los episcopales a unirse a la Red Episcopal de Política Pública y aboga por políticas que protejan los derechos de los refugiados y de los que buscan asilo.No obstante, el número de refugiados no cuenta toda la historia. En todo el mundo, la guerra y la persecución han forzado a un total de 65,3 millones de personas a abandonar sus países de origen, cuatro veces más que hace una década y el mayor número de personas desplazadas desde la segunda guerra mundial.La cumbre se produce no sólo en un momento de cifras récord de refugiados, sino también en un momento de creciente discriminación y violencia contra inmigrantes y migrantes. La crisis de los refugiados ha avivado los movimientos nacionalistas en toda Europa, donde el miedo al terrorismo y la xenofobia han hecho presa de las sociedades y han llevado a los gobiernos a tomar medidas restrictivas. La mismo ocurre, ciertamente, en parte de Estados Unidos, donde hay estados que han propuesto legislaciones bien para excluir a los refugiados de sus estados o para debilitar el programa de reasentamiento del gobierno federal.Allison Duvall, directora para las relaciones y participación eclesiásticas del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, moderó la mesa de debate del 14 de septiembre donde profesionales del reasentamiento, defensores y partidarios de los refugiados y ex refugiados compartieron sus experiencias personales y profesionales. Foto de Lynette Wilson.“Estamos reunidos aquí hoy … con antelación y en apoyo al espíritu y los objetivos de la cumbre. Frente a esta ‘crisis de solidaridad’, la Iglesia Episcopal se muestra, activa y dispuesta, a responder a esta crisis de nuestro tiempo”, dijo Allison Duvall, directora para las relaciones y participación eclesiásticas de la EMM. “Estamos en solidaridad con los objetivos de la cumbre, con las naciones del mundo que reciben a refugiados, con las que promulgan programas de reasentamiento o los expanden, con las comunidades que acogen a sus nuevos vecinos mediante el reasentamiento y, lo más importante, estamos en solidaridad con los refugiados mismos”.Como promedio, un refugiado pasa un cuarto de siglo en un campamento de refugiados hasta de ser reasentado; el UNHCR es responsable de 16,1 millones de refugiados, la mayoría de los cuales vive en África y en el Oriente Medio (Los otros 5,1 millones son refugiados palestinos registrados por el Organismo de Socorro y Obras de las Naciones Unidas).La Iglesia Episcopal se propone exigirles a los estados miembros de la ONU que sean responsables de sus compromisos, y aboga por aumentar los compromisos del país con el reasentamiento de refugiados, dijo Lacy Broemel, analista de la política sobre inmigración y refugiados de la Iglesia.Una delegación observadora en representación del obispo primado Michael Curry asistirá a la cumbre del 19 de septiembre, donde se espera que los estados miembros adopten un marco y protocolos globales para una migración segura, ordenada y regular antes del llamado de los líderes [de la cumbre] a los países a que aumenten el número de refugiados que reasientan.En tanto el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración trabaja con agencias afiliadas en comunidades a través de Estados Unidos, la Iglesia Episcopal y los episcopales abogan por los refugiados a nivel nacional a través de la labor de su oficina de relaciones gubernamentales con sede en Washington, D.C., y la Red Episcopal de Política Pública.“En EE.UU., los episcopales instan al Congreso y al Ejecutivo [al Presidente] a promover una sólida financiación para que los refugiados prosperen en sus nuevas comunidades y abogan por políticas justas y humanas para acoger a refugiados y migrantes”, dijo Broemel, que trabaja en Washington, D.C. “Trabajamos parea educar a nuestros vecinos y amigos sobre las condiciones a que se enfrentan los refugiados, y resaltamos el imperativo moral de que los refugiados vengan a EE.UU.”La Iglesia Episcopal ha trabajado por reasentar refugiados en EE.UU. desde los años 30 del pasado siglo. El Ministerio Episcopal de Migración es una de nueve agencias que trabajan en asociación con el Departamento de Estado para acoger y reasentar refugiados; este año, se espera que lleguen 85.000 refugiados, o nuevos estadounidenses.La labor y el apoyo de la Iglesia Episcopal a favor de programas que sirven a refugiados trascienden las fronteras de EE.UU.En la Diócesis Episcopal-Anglicana de El Salvador, Cristosal encabeza el empeño en el Triángulo Norte de América Central de brindar protección de emergencia y representación legal a víctimas de desplazamientos forzados y de facilitar el reasentamiento regional. La Convocación de Iglesias Episcopales en Europa participa activamente en varios ministerios y asociaciones en apoyo de refugiados. En la iglesia episcopal de San Pablo Intramuros [St. Paul’s Within the Walls ] en Roma, el Centro de Refugiados Joel Nafuma ofrece comidas, empleo e instrucción de idiomas, así como espacio para reuniones comunitarias para los refugiados, muchos de los cuales provienen de África y del Oriente Medio. En Francia, la Iglesia Episcopal, desde 2007, ha trabajado para reasentar, ofrecer servicios y ayudar a integrar a refugiados iraquíes, y ahora ayuda también a refugiados sirios, a través de la Asociación de Ingreso de las Minorías del Oriente [L’Association d’entraide aux minorités d’Orient].– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Por Lynette WilsonPosted Sep 15, 2016 Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Refugees Migration & Resettlement Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

Episcopal Church challenged to repent for when it failed to…

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA January 23, 2018 at 11:49 am This is painful subject and I respect that some who have been victimized may choose not to revisit their experience. But inviting the voice of those who suffered is an important part of repentance and re-turning the church to health and wholeness. Those victimized directly and those who perpetrated these offenses are being invited into a conversation that will aid in healing brokenness. And we are called to examine not only individual sin but corporate sin, that is, a systemic silence over many years. I cannot help but believe the silence we were met with in response to clergy misconduct in the church of my childhood was in part intended to spare members embarrassment in the larger community, avoid conflict in the congregation, and protect the children. Sins committed on our behalf… Our lamentation can only truly begin when we begin to hear the stories of pain and loss. Fran Coleman says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Executive Council, Program Budget & Finance Comments (10) Richard Basta says: georgina hegney says: Eric Bonetti says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem January 24, 2018 at 7:53 pm What Georgina Hegney said. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS P.J. Cabbiness says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 22, 2018 General Convention 2018, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Bill Louis says: January 25, 2018 at 2:24 am I applaud the Presiding Bishop’s and the President’s call from the House of Deputies to invite, listen deeply to, and seek justice with respect to documented stories of sexual harassment within TEC. Their call has encouraged me to share (with their suggested #ChurchToo hashtag) the following story: https://medium.com/@sarahlaughed/churchtoo-another-metoo-moment-in-the-episcopal-church-66644531175 January 24, 2018 at 3:43 pm How did this article go from sexual abuse reconciliation to one about the 2019-2022 budget? I know its a painful issue for the church and the article was really a softball coverage of a serious issue but why did it disappear? Too many negative comments? Rector Tampa, FL January 23, 2018 at 11:02 pm “Exceptional investment performance in 2017”. Thank you President Trump. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments are closed. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TN Executive Council January 2018, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET January 22, 2018 at 6:28 pm Of course we should not tolerate sexual abuse or exploitation of and by both genders. However, in this case , the concept of corporate guilt and thus repentance tends to bear false witness against those church members who do not or did not participate in this sin. That’s my opinion. Others may feel differently, which is fine. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Eliza Linley says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska center_img Episcopal Church challenged to repent for when it failed to protect victims of sexual exploitation, abuse Call comes as Executive Council works on draft of 2019-2021 budget January 23, 2018 at 8:58 am The reality is that the church is far from safe. When I asked the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia to mediate a dispute with my rector under the aegis of Title IV, it not only dismissed the matter, but it knowingly ignored retaliation by the rector. Most recently, +Shannon sent out a letter saying he supports the two clergy involved and criticizing family members for refusing to be reconciled. Absent so much as an apology to family members, why on earth would anyone expect reconciliation? Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Richard Price says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing [Episcopal News Service] Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, president of the House of Deputies, issued a call Jan. 22 for the Episcopal Church to spend Lent and beyond examining its history and its handling or mishandling of cases of sexual harassment, exploitation and abuse.The two say in a letter to the church that recent “compelling testimony from women who have been sexually harassed and assaulted by powerful men has turned our minds to a particularly difficult passage of holy scripture.” The story of the rape of King David’s daughter Tamar by her half-brother Amnon (2 Samuel 13:1-22), they said, “is a passage in which a conspiracy of men plots the exploitation and rape of a young woman. She is stripped of the power to speak or act, her father ignores the crime, and the fate of the rapist, not the victim, is mourned.“It is a Bible story devoid of justice.”Jennings announced the letter during the opening session of the winter meeting of the church’s Executive Council at the Maritime Institute Conference Center outside Baltimore.She and Curry call in their letter for an Ash Wednesday Day of Prayer on Feb.14, during which Episcopalians should meditate on how the church has “failed to stand with women and other victims of abuse and harassment.”“We believe that each of us has a role to play in our collective repentance,” they wrote.They added that a Lenten discipline for the church would be to “consider how to redouble the church’s effort build “communities of safety that stand against the spiritual and physical violence of sexual exploitation and abuse.”Curry and Jennings said: “As our societies have been forced into fresh recognition that women in all walks of life have suffered unspoken trauma at the hands of male aggressors and harassers, we have become convinced that the Episcopal Church must work even harder to create a church that is not simply safe, but holy, humane and decent.”The two presiding officers also want to have General Convention discuss these issues because they “want to hear the voice of the wider church as we determine how to proceed in both atoning for the church’s past and shaping a more just future.”Jennings told the council that many Christians might think that such exploitation and abuse happen only in Hollywood or in business and industry “but not in the holy work we do.” However, she said, “those problems have been endemic in our culture in the church for far longer than Hollywood, or tech culture, or corporate journalism have existed.”On the agendaExecutive Council is meeting Jan. 22-24. A major agenda item is finishing work on the canonically required draft of the 2019-2021 churchwide budget. Jennings said the current working version is filled with “big dreams and limited resources.” She told council that the final version of the budget hinges, in part, “on our ability to have holy, respectful, and civil conversations about how we allocate our resources for God’s work in the world.”According to the joint rules of General Convention (II.10.c.ii on page 227 here), council must give its draft budget to General Convention’s Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance (PB&F) no less than four months before the start of General Convention (essentially by February of convention year). PB&F will meet next from Feb. 5-7 to begin work on that draft budget.Council’s Joint Standing Committee on Finances for Mission (FFM) has been crafting the draft budget for much of the current triennium, gathering information and input from committees, the churchwide staff, dioceses and Episcopalians. While council is not required to give PB&F a balanced budget, that is FFM’s goal, the Rev. Mally Lloyd, the committee member leading the budget work, told council Jan. 22.The committee has eliminated a large gap between anticipated revenue and those big dreams Jennings mentioned. The deficit was just more than $12 million at the start of council’s October meeting and $8 million at the end.Council then asked the church for input on the budget in November and posted a version showing that FFM had reduced the deficit to $4.5 million.On Jan. 22, Lloyd and FFM chair Tess Judge showed the council a current working draft that is essentially balanced. Revenue is increased based on the fact that diocesan income was up nearly 3 percent in 2016 over 2015. Based on the formula used to calculated diocesan payments to the churchwide budget, that means $2 million more in the coming triennium.Tess Judge, chair of the Finances for Mission (FFM) committee, reports on the big work of this #excoun meeting: the draft budget. pic.twitter.com/JLknDFCzj6— Holli (@BeingHolli) January 22, 2018What Judge called exceptional investment performance in 2017 of 20 percent added $1 million to the anticipated income for the coming triennium, based on how the draw on investment income is calculated.In addition, Lloyd said “we adjusted every single expense line a little bit” to trim $1.5 million, thus making up the $4.5 million deficit.“Brothers and sisters, we still have some work to do,” Judge told council members, explaining that some line items still need to be tweaked after talking with staff.Judge and Lloyd stressed that it is hard to do a line-by-line comparison of the current budget and the draft of the 2019-2021 plan. The current budget was structured around the Five Marks of Mission while the draft is built on categories of the Jesus Movement. “It’s a lot of new things and a lot of changed things in this budget,” Lloyd said. Council discussed how to note those differences in the document it sends to PB&F.Council is due to vote on the final version of its draft budget on Jan. 24.The rest of the meetingAfter the opening plenary on Jan. 22, council spent the rest of the day meeting in its five committees. Council will meet again in plenary the morning of Jan. 23. The members will approve its Blue Book report to General Convention and elect the bishop member to its Anglican Consultative Council delegation. On Jan. 24, council committees will each report to the full body, proposing resolutions for the full body to consider.Some council members are tweeting from the meeting using #ExCoun.The Executive Council carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1). The council comprises 38 members – 20 of whom (four bishops, four priests or deacons, and 12 lay people) are elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by the nine provincial synods for six-year terms – plus the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies. In addition, the vice president of the House of Deputies, secretary, chief operating officer, treasurer and chief financial officer have a seat and voice but no vote.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is interim managing editor of the Episcopal News Service. Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Sarah Dylan Breuer says: richard Waller says: January 23, 2018 at 2:06 am It is most frequently clergymen in positions of power who have committed these abuses. And clergy- and laywomen who have suffered. Not sure that calling the whole church to repentance rings true here. It may be adding insult to injury for many. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN January 23, 2018 at 11:01 am Very good. Possibly the church might summon up the moral courage to confront the Trump regime. January 23, 2018 at 12:45 pm You mean in the same way it summoned up the courage to confront the Clinton regime? Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

Massachusetts bishops call for offering to support disaster relief after…

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Submit a Press Release [Diocese of Massachusetts] In the aftermath of the natural gas system crisis on Thursday, Sept. 13, that caused explosions, fires and emergency evacuations in the Merrimack Valley, all three Episcopal churches and one Episcopal school in the affected communities — Christ Church in Andover, St. Paul’s Church in North Andover and Grace Church and Esperanza Academy in Lawrence – -report no property damage and no known personal injuries, but at least two church families in Lawrence and one in Andover whose homes were affected by fires.  Many in all three communities, located about 25 miles north of Boston, continue to be affected by the evacuations and ongoing power outages.As of Friday afternoon, diocesan personnel were in the process of reaching out to the Brooks School in North Andover and the Episcopal chaplain at Phillips Academy in Andover.The cause of the crisis is still under investigation by federal and state officials.  News media report one Lawrence teenager killed and at least 20 injured in Thursday’s disaster, which caused at least 60 separate fires and the evacuation of thousands of people from their homes.  Many schools and businesses remained closed and some 18,000 electric company customers were without power on Friday, according to news reports.“The prayers and concern of our entire diocesan family are with those in the Merrimack Valley communities affected by this disaster,” Bishop Alan M. Gates said Sept. 14. “Bishop Gayle Harris and I, together with regional canon Martha Hubbard, have been directly in contact with the clergy of our parishes in those communities and our colleagues at Esperanza Academy. A number of their families have been directly affected, together with countless others who will need our support in the weeks ahead. I invite from all corners of the diocese your continuing prayers and contributions toward relief efforts.”To that end, the bishops ask all congregations in the diocese to consider designating or collecting an offering in support of a diocesan relief response. Those offerings should be made payable to the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts and marked “Merrimack Valley Disaster Relief.” Contributions may be sent to the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts, Attn: Lauren Zook, 138 Tremont Street, Boston MA 02111.As the situation unfolds, the bishops, together with local clergy and disaster response contacts, Deacon Jay Jordan, Episcopal Relief & Development disaster preparedness coordinator in the Diocese of Massachusetts, and Canon to the Ordinary Bill Parnell, Episcopal Relief & Development disaster response coordinator for the diocese, will continue to be in conversation to determine what longer-term response might be needed.In a conference call on Sept. 14, Episcopal clergy in the affected communities expressed their gratitude for the outpouring of prayers, concern and support they’ve already received. One of the ways people can be of help to them, they said, is to be patient as they prioritize the immediate care of their communities and families and take time to determine what will be needed in the days ahead.Prayer and liturgy resources for use in times of disaster are available from Episcopal Relief & Development here. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Posted Sep 14, 2018 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Massachusetts bishops call for offering to support disaster relief after gas explosionslast_img read more

Slate of candidates for the eighth bishop of the Diocese…

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Diocese of Northern California] The Standing Committee announces the slate of candidates who will appear on the ballot for the eighth bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Northern California on Feb. 9, 2019.The candidates are (alphabetical order):The Rev. Matthew D. Cowden, rector of St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church, South Bend, IndianaThe Rev. Christopher Brooke Craun, rector of St. Michael & All Angels Episcopal Church, Portland, OregonThe Rev. Canon Megan Traquair, canon to the ordinary, Diocese of Arizona, Phoenix, ArizonaThe Rev. Randall R. Warren, D.Min., rector of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Kalamazoo, MichiganOn Saturday, Dec. 1, members of the Search Committee presented these candidates to the Standing Committee. In a closed session, the Standing Committee further discerned and voted on each candidate, unanimously approving each of the candidates listed above.Dec. 5, 2018, marks the opening of a petition period, with any petitions due by Dec.  12, 2018. A final slate, including any approved petition candidates, will be published by mid-January 2019.A special electing convention is scheduled for Feb.9, 2019. A service of ordination and consecration is expected to take place on June 29, 2019, in Davis, California.The full announcement can be found on the Bishop Search website.The Episcopal Diocese of Northern California encompasses all of Northern California from Sacramento north, except for the five counties of the San Francisco Bay Area. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Slate of candidates for the eighth bishop of the Diocese of Northern California announced Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Tags Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Elections Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Posted Dec 5, 2018 Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listinglast_img read more

Same-sex spouses not invited to next year’s Lambeth Conference of…

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Human Sexuality, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Same-Sex Marriage Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Lambeth Conference, Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 18, 2019 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Same-sex spouses not invited to next year’s Lambeth Conference of bishops Archbishop of Canterbury bases decision on 20-year-old resolution from previous gathering Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Many of the major liturgies during the Lambeth Conference of bishops take place at Canterbury Cathedral, the seat of the archbishop of Canterbury and what is considered the “mother church” of the Anglican Communion. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby is not inviting same-sex spouses to the 2020 Lambeth Conference of bishops.Public word of Welby’s decision came in an Anglican Communion News Service blog post by Anglican Communion Secretary General Josiah Idowu-Fearon. He wrote that “invitations have been sent to every active bishop” because “that is how it should be – we are recognizing that all those consecrated into the office of bishop should be able to attend.” Those invitations traditionally come from the archbishop of Canterbury.“But the invitation process has also needed to take account of the Anglican Communion’s position on marriage which is that it is the lifelong union of a man and a woman,” Idowu-Fearon wrote. “That is the position as set out in Resolution I.10 of the 1998 Lambeth Conference. Given this, it would be inappropriate for same-sex spouses to be invited to the conference.”Idowu-Fearon said that the archbishop of Canterbury “has had a series of private conversations by phone or by exchanges of letter with the few individuals to whom this applies.”Resolution 1.10 was passed by the conference in 1998 after heated debate.The Episcopal Church currently has one actively serving bishop who has a same-sex spouse. The Rt. Rev. Mary Glasspool was elected as bishop suffragan of the Diocese of Los Angeles in December 2009 and consecrated May 2010. She has been bishop assistant in the Diocese of New York since April 2016. She is married to Becki Sander, her partner of more than 30 years.Diocese of New York Bishop Assistant Mary GlasspoolGlasspool told Episcopal News Service Feb. 18 in a telephone interview that she received a letter from Welby on Dec. 4, 2018, in which he said that he was writing to her “directly as I feel I owe you an explanation of my decision not to invite your spouse to the Lambeth Conference, a decision that I am well aware will cause you pain, which I regret deeply.”Welby met with Glasspool and Sander in September when he visited Trinity Wall Street. She called it a get-acquainted session, which did not touch on the Lambeth Conference.Glasspool said she and Sander, New York Bishop Andy Dietsche and New York Bishop Suffragan Allen Shin “have been praying about this and talking about this” since receiving the letter. Presiding Bishop Michael Curry also met with Glasspool and Sander to discuss Welby’s letter. “One of my takeaways was how can we make a positive, creative, responsive witness to the love of God in Jesus Christ our Lord,” she said about how they and the church should respond to his decision.Curry was in South Africa Feb. 18 and issued a short statement saying, “I have not yet had an opportunity to consult with appropriate leadership in the church but will do so.”Both Glasspool and Sander replied to Welby in separate letters later in December. Glasspool said her two-page letter to Welby, parts of which she read to ENS, told him about her 30-year experience in The Episcopal Church “and where the church has come,” and evoked Martin Luther King Jr.’s Letter from Birmingham Jail, especially his emphasis on just and unjust laws.“When will the church accept to it the gift of the LGBTQ community?” she asked Welby. “Young people are watching us. If they haven’t written off all of Christianity for being homophobic, they do find The Episcopal Church inviting and inclusive.”She told the archbishop, “The important thing I want to say is it’s about love. I am talking about people who love one another and look to the church to support them in their life-long marriage where the values of faithfulness, respect, dignity, truth-telling, monogamy and the love that is our loving God’s gift to all of us are upheld.“After a lifetime of discussion, I am relatively confident that The Episcopal Church will never again turn its back on the LGBTQ community. Will the same be said of Lambeth 2020?”Spouses who attended the 2008 Lambeth Conference of bishops pose July 25 on the University of Kent campus in Canterbury. Photo: Anglican ArchivesGlasspool told ENS that Sander noted in their conversation about Welby’s decision that it seems to be based in part on an apparent assumption that “spouses are simply an extension of the bishop to whom they are married, and that somehow there is a view of marriage that doesn’t quite sit well with an egalitarian or reciprocal or a mutual partnership” model.The bishop said that she expects to attend Lambeth 2020, and she has asked Sander to come with her for support. “The issue is will she be included in the conversation,” Glasspool said.Glasspool said she plans to “consult, as much as people are willing” at the House of Bishops previously scheduled meeting March 12-15, 2019, at Kanuga outside Hendersonville, North Carolina. “Not with the expectation that we are all of one mind, but because I do not wish to respond only as an individual, but rather with a sensitivity to the body as a whole,” she said.Prior to the House of Bishops meeting in March, the church’s Executive Council, composed of bishops, clergy and laity, begins its winter meeting Feb. 21 in Midwest City, Oklahoma.Maine Bishop-Elect Thomas James BrownThe Rev. Thomas Brown is due to be ordained and consecrated on June 22 as the next bishop of the Diocese of Maine. He is married to the Rev. Thomas Mousin. The diocese elected Brown on Feb. 9. His election is about to enter the consent process canonically required in all bishop elections. A majority of diocesan standing committees and bishops with jurisdiction must sign off on each election.Brown told ENS that he would not comment about the Lambeth Conference decision because of his pending consent process.Diocese of Toronto Bishop Suffragan Kevin Robertson married Mohan Sharma on Dec. 28, 2018. The diocese congratulated him on his marriage, which was attended by Toronto Archbishop Colin Johnson and Toronto Bishop Diocesan Andrew Asbil.Robertson said in a telephone interview with ENS Feb. 18 that Welby told him in person that Sharma would not be invited. Robertson was at Lambeth Palace, Welby’s official London residence, on Feb. 7 as part of an annual 10-day new-bishop orientation run by Canterbury Cathedral when he was summoned to Welby’s office. The conversation occurred two days before Brown’s election in Maine.Diocese of Toronto Bishop Suffragan Kevin Robertson“He said to me there are only two of you in the communion in this situation, you and Mary, and he said if I invite your spouses to the Lambeth Conference, there won’t be a Lambeth Conference,” Robertson said.Welby, Robertson said, seemed to be “willing to move beyond what happened in 2008 when Gene Robinson was not invited. He was willing to invite me and Mary, but that it was too much of a step to invite our spouses as well.”Their conversation came on the same day that Nigerian Archbishop Nicholas Okoh, the primate of the Anglican Church of Nigeria and the chairman of the Global Anglican Future Conference, or GAFCON, issued a “warning” saying that he expected that Robertson “and his partner will be attending [Lambeth] and received in good standing.”Okoh said, “With great sadness we therefore have to conclude that the Lambeth Conference of 2020 will itself be an obstacle to the gospel by embracing teaching and a pattern of life which are profoundly at odds with the biblical witness and the apostolic Christianity through the ages.”Robertson said the refusal to invite his and Glasspool’s spouses is “hurtful.” He said he and Sharma, who have two children, have been together for 10 years.“I actually find it quite offensive. I know that’s a strong word, but I’m aware the Anglican Communion is not of one mind around marriage,” he said. “However, the decision to invite all the other spouses without inviting ours, I think, sends a very clear message about the way that same-sex relationships are regarded in the communion. I think that’s a troubling sign.”Robertson said his first instinct was not to go with Lambeth without his spouse. While he has not made a final decision, he said that, at the moment, he thinks it’s important for all of the bishops who will find themselves in this position to go so that their voices are at the table.During his time with the 29 bishops who were part the orientation in Canterbury, Robertson said some of them discussed Okoh’s letter. While they all did not agree, those conversations “reminded me that it’s so important to be in conversation; it’s so important to being in the process of building relationships, that that is only way we are going to get through this,” Robertson said.“Frankly, it’s why I am so disappointed about the spouses not being invited. If we’re going to get through this, it will be because people come to know bishops in same-sex relationships and realize that we’re people too. It’s not by keeping people away. I think that’s the worst thing to do.”The General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada is scheduled to vote in July 2019 on changing its marriage canon to allow same-sex marriage.The bishops at the 2008 Lambeth Conference of bishops pose July 25 for the traditional group photo. Photo: Anglican ArchivesThe Lambeth Conference is a periodic gathering of bishops from across the Anglican Communion, which the archbishop of Canterbury calls and issues invitations for. The last gathering was in 2008. The July 23-Aug 2, 2020, gathering will be held, as is tradition, in Canterbury, England, with most of the sessions at the University of Kent.Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and his wife, Caroline, are featured on the home page of the 2020 Lambeth Conference. Photo: 2020 Lambeth ConferenceSpouses have typically participated in a parallel program. However, in 2020, there will be a joint program for the first time. Spouses of bishops will attend combined sessions “at key points in the overall program,” according to information here. There will also be separate sessions on the specific responsibilities of the ministry for bishops and spouses, according to the Lambeth website. The conference’s website features a photo of Welby and his wife, Caroline. The page was recently changed to add a link to Idowu-Fearon’s blog. It now reads, “The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, is sending personal invitations to every eligible bishop and spouse (excluding same-sex spouses) and is looking forward immensely to hosting them.”Idowu-Fearon’s statement that “all those consecrated into the office of bishop should be able to attend” the Lambeth gathering might be seen as a certain amount of movement beyond the most-recent previous Lambeth Conference. In 2008 then-Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams refused to invite Bishop Gene Robinson, who had become the first openly gay and partnered bishop in the Anglican Communion in 2003. He served as bishop of New Hampshire until his retirement in January 2013. He and his then-partner of 25 years, Mark Andrew, were joined in a civil union in 2008 and married in 2010. They divorced in 2014.At the House of Bishops meeting in March 2008, three bishops whom then-Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori asked to discuss Robinson’s then-still-pending invitation reported that “a full invitation is not possible.”Robinson urged his colleagues not to boycott the conference because of his exclusion. Instead, addressing the House of Bishops, he urged them to participate fully in it, and thanked all who were willing to “stay at the table.”At the end of that meeting, the bishops said in part, “Even though we did not all support the consecration of the Bishop of New Hampshire, we acknowledge that he is a canonically elected and consecrated bishop in this church. We regret that he alone among bishops ministering within the territorial boundaries of their dioceses and provinces, did not receive an invitation to attend the Lambeth Conference.”Then-Diocese of New Hampshire Bishop Gene Robinson signs copies of his book “In the Eye of the Storm” July 31, 2008, in the Lambeth Conference Marketplace on the University of Kent campus in Canterbury. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceSome other bishops from across the more than 165 countries in which the Anglican Communion is present refused to attend the 2008 Lambeth Conference due to theological disagreements with the main body of the church about the full inclusion of LGBTQ people and women in the life of the church.Robinson went to the gathering in what he called an act of witness. Organizers permitted him to be in the Lambeth Marketplace, the conference’s display and sales area, an invitation he initially refused. He was also allowed to attend two receptions hosted by Episcopal Church bishops that were specifically intended to allow him to meet colleagues from around the world. He was invited to worship and speak at several other venues in the Canterbury area, including the University of Kent’s law school.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter.Editor’s note: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that then-Presiding Bishop Frank Griswold asked a small group of bishops to speak to the archbishop of Canterbury about Bishop Gene Robinson’s invitation. It was then-Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more

Alabama church removes pew, plaque dedicated to Confederate President Jefferson…

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release By David PaulsenPosted Feb 8, 2019 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 center_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Collierville, TN A pew known as the Jefferson Davis pew is seen among newer pews at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Montgomery, Alabama. Photo: David Berenguer[Episcopal News Service] The pew had been an unmistakable fixture for decades at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Montgomery, Alabama. Online photos show the pew – a cross-shaped poppyhead carved in its wooden finial – sticking out among the rows and rows of newer, plainer-looking pews that filled the rest of the church.One other detail made this pew stand out: It was known as the Jefferson Davis pew and had an accompanying plaque touting its history, a tribute to the Confederate president who attended St. John’s for three months in 1861 before the capital of the Confederacy was moved from Montgomery to Richmond, Virginia.Today, that pew is in storage. The congregation removed it recently and moved a newer pew from the back of the church to take its place. The plaque was removed, too. “To continue to allow the pew to be in our worship space would be troublesome,” the Rev. Robert Wisnewski, rector at St. John’s, said this week in a message to the congregation.Confederate President Jefferson Davis is seen in this portrait by Matthew Brady. Source: National ArchivesAt a time when Episcopal churches and institutions across the country are reckoning with their historical ties to slavery, the Confederacy and Jim Crow segregation, Wisnewski and vestry members took steps to set the record straight at St. John’s. They removed the Jefferson Davis pew, Wisnewski said, because its ties to Davis were false and its dedication ceremony 94 years ago was a political act steeped in racism, which runs counter to Christianity.“Davis was a political figure, not a church figure, nor even a member of the parish,” Wisnewski wrote. “Acting to remove the pew and plaque is the correction of a political act and hopefully will help us all to focus more completely on the love of Christ for all people.”Wisnewski, when reached by email, declined Episcopal News Service’s request for an interview, saying he had “nothing to add to the statement I’ve made,” though he clarified why the church began scrutinizing the history of the pew and plaque.“In teaching a Sunday school class this past fall, I became aware of the pew’s dedication not occurring until 1925,” said Wisnewski, who has served at St. John’s since 1995. That detail was the first loose thread that led to the unraveling of the story of the Jefferson Davis pew.Wisnewski noted the plaque at St. John’s called Davis “a communicant,” but Davis was not yet a confirmed Episcopalian when he attended services at St. John’s. The pew that was dedicated in 1925 wasn’t an original, Wisnewski said. The congregation had replaced the old pews with new ones in the early 1900s. By the 1930s, a pew from Davis’ era had been re-installed and labeled, but its ties to the Confederate figure were uncertain at best.More troubling was evidence that the 1925 dedication ceremony championed white supremacy as openly as any nods to local history. Its timing, with racism and segregation on the rise, coincided with the “Lost Cause” campaign across the South, which sought to rehabilitate the image of the Confederacy and its leaders by denying the South fought the Civil War to protect slavery.Montgomery’s roots in antebellum SouthIn the 1950s, Montgomery would become a pivotal battleground in the civil rights movement, with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., as pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, joining others in leading the successful Montgomery bus boycott. But a century earlier, Alabama’s capital city was known as a commerce hub in the slave-powered cotton empire of the antebellum South.St. John’s Episcopal Church in Montgomery, Alabama, is seen in an undated historic photo. Photo: St. John’s, via websiteSt. John’s is Montgomery’s oldest Episcopal parish. It formed in 1834, and in 1837, the congregation completed construction of its 48-pew brick church. When membership topped 100, the congregation built a new church in 1855, and slaves were given use of the old brick church, according to a guidebook published by the Civil Heritage Trail.Montgomery “was the exhilarated, thronging capital of the Confederate States of America” in the first months of 1861, the guidebook says, and Davis was inaugurated the Confederacy’s president in the city on Feb. 18.Davis was raised a Baptist and only began attending Episcopal services in Montgomery at the urging of his second wife, Varina.“We have no way of knowing how many times he or his family attended, perhaps only a few times or perhaps as many as a dozen times,” Wisnewski said in his message to the congregation about the Davis pew. “Since Davis was not confirmed, it is probable that he never received Holy Communion here and technically was not a communicant.”After leaving Montgomery, Davis was confirmed in 1862 at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Richmond, once known as the Cathedral of the Confederacy. Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee also worshiped at St. Paul’s.Pew plaques and stained glass windows at St. Paul’s had long touted the Richmond church’s historical ties to those two prominent Confederate figures when, in 2015, St. Paul’s launched its History and Reconciliation Initiative to re-examine that history and consider whether changes were warranted.A massacre was the catalyst.On June 17, 2015, Dylann Roof opened fire at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, killing nine black worshippers. When photos surfaced of Roof posing with a Confederate flag, it fueled a nationwide debate over the racist legacy of such imagery and its embrace by white supremacists.At St. Paul’s, the congregation decided to remove all representations of Confederate battle flags but to keep family memorials to fallen Confederate soldiers, and the congregation left untouched its plaques marking the pews where Davis and Lee once sat.In 2017, a violent clash between white supremacists and counterprotesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the fate of the city’s Confederate statues led to a new round of national debates and amplified calls to remove such symbols from public display, including at Episcopal institutions. Washington National Cathedral in the nation’s capital removed stained glass windows depicting Lee and a fellow Confederate general, Stonewall Jackson. Sewanee: University of the South in Tennessee moved a statue of another Confederate general from a prominent spot on campus to the university’s cemetery. R.E. Lee Memorial Church in Lexington, Virginia, changed its name back to its original Grace Episcopal Church.“The argument is simple: The Confederacy fought to maintain slavery and white supremacy in the United States, and this isn’t something the country should honor in any way,” Joe McDaniel Jr., a member of General Convention’s Committee for Racial Justice and Reconciliation, said this week in an interview with ENS.General Convention has passed numerous resolutions over the years to guide The Episcopal Church as it responds to racism and atones for its own complicity in racial injustice and support for racist systems. Such efforts have led to the creation of the Becoming Beloved Community framework, now the church’s cornerstone initiative on racial reconciliation.McDaniel, a 58-year-old retired lawyer living in Pensacola, Florida, said he has followed closely the debate over Confederate statues and other memorials in recent years. He disputes arguments that removing such monuments amounts to erasing history. The monuments were not motivated by Southern pride or benign historic preservation, McDaniel said, but rather to promote a cause that was dedicated to keeping black Americans enslaved.“Most of America is finally coming to terms with that,” McDaniel said. “I applaud St. John’s action in moving the Jefferson Davis pew.”Little doubt about Davis pew’s racist pedigreeVestry members made that decision last weekend at a planning retreat, Wisnewski said in his written message, after he brought his research on the pew to their attention, including the evidence that the pew was not in place for the 1925 dedication.“The lore that the pew had been in place since the beginning of the Civil War and always known as the Jefferson Davis Pew is not true,” Wisnewski said.The rector also discovered details of the 1925 dedication ceremony, which featured a speech by writer and historian John Trotwood Moore, known as “an apologist for the Old South” who espoused virulent white supremacist rhetoric and defended lynching.John Trotwood Moore was known as an “apologist for the Old South.” He spoke at the dedication of the Jefferson Davis pew in 1925. Source: Tennessee State Library and ArchivesA 1999 article in the Tennessee Historical Quarterly provides a description of Moore’s speech at the dedication of the Jefferson Davis pew, based on contemporary newspaper reports. The event was attended by Alabama’s governor and other civic leaders, and Moore was “their natural choice to deliver appropriate words,” according to the article’s author, Fred Arthur Bailey.In addition to hailing Davis as a “pure blooded Anglo Saxon,” Moore made a case that racial purity and white superiority were part of Davis’ legacy.“We are the children not of our father and mother but of our race,” Moore said. “It is well to teach our children that they are well bred, descendants of heroes. Only the pure breed ever reaches the stars.”Wisnewski indicated that Moore’s role in the dedication of the pew gave little doubt about its racist pedigree.“Confederate monuments and symbols have increasingly been used by groups that promote white supremacy and are now, to many people of all races, seen to represent insensitivity, hatred, and even evil,” Wisnewski said.“The mission of our parish is diametrically opposed to what these symbols have come to mean. … Even if the actions which brought about the Jefferson Davis Pew in 1925 were only to memorialize an historical fact, and that appears improbable, the continuance of its presence presents a political statement.”The vestry voted to remove the pew and place it and the plaque honoring Davis in the church’s archives.“This was not done to rewrite our history or to dishonor our forebears,” Wisnewski wrote in his message to the congregation. The current vestry would not vote to add such a pew honoring Davis, so it would be “troublesome” to let the existing pew remain.“St. John’s prides itself in being a spiritual home for all people and a place where politics takes a back seat to the nurture of our souls,” Wisnewski said. “Our worship space is sacred and should direct our hearts to the love of God without distraction.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Alabama church removes pew, plaque dedicated to Confederate President Jefferson Davis Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Racial Justice & Reconciliation Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel last_img read more