Family members describe moment they discovered Jayme Closs was safe

first_imgCourtesy Jennifer Smith(NEW YORK) — Robert Naiberg said he could barely speak when police called to tell him that his granddaughter, 13-year-old Jayme Closs, had been found.“I was overwhelmed. I couldn’t talk,” Naiberg said on ABC News’ Good Morning America Monday. “I was the first one she gave a hug too. I was standing in my daughter Jennifer’s hallway, and she gave me a big hug.”“She hugged everybody that was there — we tried not to overwhelm her,” he added.Jayme escaped and was discovered Thursday, after spending three months in captivity with a man who allegedly abducted her from her Wisconsin home in October and killed her parents, Denise and James Closs, authorities said.She was found in Gordon, Wisconsin, about 70 miles north of her hometown of Barron. Jake Allard, a cousin who was present for the joyful reunion, said Jayme couldn’t stop smiling when she arrived home with her aunt, Jennifer Smith.“It’s unreal how everybody in the afternoon, about four hours, got her room ready for her,” Allard told GMA. “When Jennifer and her husband went to pick her up, the room was empty. When they got back, it was all done.”“Jayme’s dog was there. He crawled right up on her lap and snuggled up to her,” he added.Smith shared a heartfelt image of Jayme on Facebook Saturday, showing the young girl smiling and cuddling with her dogs.“Jayme had a pretty good night’s sleep,” Smith wrote in the post. “It was great to know she was next to me all night. What a great feeling to have her home.”Naiberg said the family recorded video of her parents’ funeral for her with hopes that it might give her a bit of closure.“They taped the funeral for her, but they’re not going to show it to her …” Naiberg said. “When she’s ready.”Allard, who described Jayme as shy and quiet, said he’s worried about how she’ll process the tragedy.“My biggest concern was that she was real close to her mother,” Allard said. “Her mother was really good to her. Her dad was too.”Jake Patterson, 21, of Gordon, was arrested and charged with kidnapping Jayme and killing her parents, officials said. He’s scheduled to make his initial court appearance on the charges Monday, and his attorney, Charlie Glynn, said it’s too early to discuss specifics of the case.“This is a tragic situation from every perspective,” Glynn told GMA. “Lots of heavy hearts, lots of thoughts and prayers going around.”“His feelings and emotions are consistent with what you would expect,” he added.It’s unclear if some of Jayme’s family will attend the hearing.“I know I’m not going to go,” Allard said. “He has lawyers, and I do not want to listen to them. Anyone who could do something like this deserves a max sentence.” Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

With retooled shot, Brendan Curry assumes larger role

first_imgBefore his college lacrosse trainees return home for the summer, shooting coach Torre Kasemeyer spends his Saturday nights watching game film. He calls players on Sunday with feedback and they discuss off-season goals. Through five games, Kasemeyer saw the same themes in Brendan Curry’s game. The sophomore saw himself as a facilitator, Kasemeyer said, and his speed often forced slides and opened passing lanes.With a quick first step, Curry could always shoot on the run. But what if he modified his release motion, changed the pacing of his stride and stepped into slides?“You can be a 20 goal scorer and stay where you are,” Kasemeyer said. “Or you can be close to a 30 and pick this up.”When Curry left campus for the summer, SU head coach John Desko told the rising sophomore to improve his shooting. He favored a sidearm on the run shot, and still does sometimes in moving situations. Last year, Curry had played hero for Syracuse against North Carolina when he scored two goals in the final minutes of regulation and assisted the overtime winner. But Kasemeyer saw the opportunity for Curry to build on his usual sweep down the right alley. And that training — combined with an injury to midfielder Tucker Dordevic — vaulted Curry’s production to a projected second-team All-American midway through the season while leading the midfield in points (27) ahead of the Orange’s game on Saturday against North Carolina.“My shooting’s been subpar,” Curry said after scoring on one of 12 shots against Duke. “I’m getting a lot of shots off and they’re not really falling, not all of them so I just got to keep working on that.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textCurry’s worked with Kasemeyer since his freshman of high school at Calvert Hall College (Baltimore) High School, where Kasemeyer is the team’s offensive coordinator. Kasmeyer noted Curry’s biggest improvement since he’s first met him was strength development, but this summer he coupled that with technical practices. Over the past summer, Curry worked with Kasemeyer through Gotskillz Lacrosse, where Kasemeyer trains lacrosse’s top shooters.This year, Curry’s moved his hands further away from his body to elongate the shooting motion, therefore generating more power. Kasemeyer compared it to a rubber band: the further back you pull the band, the more velocity upon release.Curry’s shooting motion is different, too. With time and space, Curry’s shooting more overhand. It provides more options in changing planes, Kasemeyer said, like starting with a stick high and shooting the ball low, or starting with the stick on the right and shooting to the left. Shooting overhand also limits the goalie’s ability to read the shot’s direction. When the shot comes from the side, the goalie can follow it all the way through the motion. When it’s overhand, the goalie can’t see the ball until it’s being released.“You usually try to go far pipe,” Curry said, “change your plan, drop your shoulder a little bit.”Anna Henderson | Digital Design EditorKasemeyer had Curry perform normal shooting on the run drills, but instead of traveling six or seven yards in a few strides after catching the ball, Curry stretched his steps. Stepping eight or nine yards in the same amount of paces meant a bigger step into his motion. Over the course of the off-season, Kasemeyer estimated Curry went from shots in the upper 80s to the low 90s in miles per hour.In Syracuse’s most recent game against Cornell, Curry caught a pass about 14 yards out from the goalie. With a moment before a defender came, he switched from his left hand to his right and stomped nearly three yards forward. His stick swung through and rocketed the ball into the left corner of the net.“He’s got a good first step,” Desko said. “He’s got good speed after the first step which gives him distance from the defender. And the bottom line then is, hit the back of the net. And I think he worked hard at that.”And there’s more to add to his game. Kasemeyer thinks with Curry’s speed, which forces defenses to slide, and the more powerful shot he could be scoring six or seven points a game. Curry wasn’t fond of his 1-of-12 shooting performance against Duke, despite scoring the game winner.Kasemeyer wants to work on inverting Curry, meaning he’d dodge from an attack spot though playing midfield. And he wants him to learn the step-down shot once more, this time left handed.“I think he’s a world team guy,” Kasemeyer said. “I’ve said since his junior year of high school, his game is tailored made for it and he doesn’t do anything but get better every year.” Comments Published on April 10, 2019 at 11:13 pm Contact Josh: [email protected] | @Schafer_44 Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more